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Thread: Verizon Rolls Out Low Band 5G Nationwide

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeInPa View Post
    I’m curious on what’s Verizon’s requirements are for the city to be listed as a mmWave city. I know it is in multiple places here in Pittsburgh PA but it’s not listed as a mmWave city on Verizon’s website.


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    There are a lot of cities here where they have it deployed in random spots but I guess they categorize them all under the Detroit market. There's gonna be a lot of areas that will get some mmWave that aren't mentioned.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merlin_AZ View Post
    Can someone please explain to this novice the different 5G entities?
    I know at least one of them won't travel more than 10 feet if your hand blocks the signal. Seems useless.
    UWB, mmWave, sub6, low band, etc, etc.
    Thanks.
    mmWave 5G is UWB (n260,n261) and coverage is getting better. Rain drops and puting your hand between the phone and 5G node doesn't block the signal anymore. Some users have seen coverage beyond a half a mile in some areas so very promising. Sub-6 GHz is low and mid band 5G(n2,n5,n41,n66,n71) and is similar to the characteristics of LTE.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 10mm View Post
    mmWave 5G is UWB (n260,n261) and coverage is getting better. Rain drops and puting your hand between the phone and 5G node doesn't block the signal anymore. Some users have seen coverage beyond a half a mile in some areas so very promising. Sub-6 GHz is low and mid band 5G(n2,n5,n41,n66,n71) and is similar to the characteristics of LTE.
    Thanks! 10char

  4. #19
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    You can see the 5G coverage area on their maps.

    https://www.verizon.com/coverage-map/

    Shows the Nationwide 5G and 5G Ultra Wideband.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jtbky View Post
    You can see the 5G coverage area on their maps.

    https://www.verizon.com/coverage-map/

    Shows the Nationwide 5G and 5G Ultra Wideband.
    Any coverage map is useless unless you live in a well populated or well traveled area. Their old map show'd I have 4G/LTE. Yes but barely since I'm approx 5 miles from a tower. And other areas showing on their map have zero. Their new map says I have 5G/4G lte. True about the 4G part as mentioned. But with the range of 5G it sure isn't here now or won't be for a very very very long time if ever. Unless somethings changed, 5G doesn't have the range for rural areas. And there's no fiber here either.

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    I am glad to see Verizon has been able to rollout a national network. I have heard of issues with DSS in particular, which is why T-Mo and ATT at least started with dedicated spectrum.

    I do want to see how it play out and if the bugs with DSS did finally get worked out too.
    Drako Swiftclaw

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    Independent Tech for DTech Seattle

  7. #22
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    mmwave is the one where it more or less propagates more or less like a light bulb, UWB stands for "ultra wide band" and is referring to mmwave band. Two common bands are 28 and 39ghz. At present, it's pretty strictly line of site, leaves and a person's hand blocking it and all that. But it does propagate similar to light, it can reflect off surfaces, squeeze in under door jam and such, I don't think it uses that well now but they're expecting radio firmware updates (don't know if it's just on the cell site or on cell site and phone..) to allow that (edit: based on what 10mm says, those updates are out and running. Good to know!). This gets high speeds partly through very wide channels (it supports 50, 100, 200 and 400mhz channels , versus 1.4, 3, 5, 10, 20 for sub6).

    sub6 is both low and mid band (used to be like sub-1ghz was low band, PCS/AWS was mid band, i.e. 1-2.4ghz or so, and the stuff above 2.4ghz wifi band up to about 6ghz was high band, since there was no mmwave used how it is now; but now, sub-1ghz is low, 1-6 is mid band; techincally anything over 6ghz is high band, in practice there's nothing between 6 and like 27ghz or so so "high band" is mmwave.)

    Low band gets the highest range but there's not as much of it so a phone co will have less capacity there, mid band gets less range but the phone co usually has a lot more of it, higher capacity. And high band gets much less range but much more capacity.

  8. #23
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    band 5's a good one to run 5G on (DSS or otherwise); I wonder how much 4G traffic it has been carrying anyway? My phone seems to show (in order of how often I see it) 4, 13, 2, and 5, I've seen 5 occasionally but really not that often. Could see a fairly high percentage 5G traffic!

    I don't have a 5G phone but I'm in that blob of 5G coverage in eastern IA, I hadn't noticed anything had happened, and now that I run speedtests I'm not seeing any difference; I can at least report that DSS is not losing enough capacity to affect anything on a fairly busy network. (Edit: I looked through my old speedtest results from roughly same time of day and location, and can confirm that, then and now the speed fluctuates quite a bit minute-to-minute but 10-20 with occasional test nearer to 30 or occasional "bad test" that's closer to 6, haven't seen a slow test today though.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    All plans get access to the "nationwide" 5G network. Honestly it's not going to be any faster than 4G
    Even a 8 gig data plan?


    Sent from my iPhone using HoFo

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    Anyone know what is going on with the low band 5g. I had the 5g icon showing on my phone but now it is back to showing 4g again. I am not sure what is going on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpz1 View Post
    ...But with the range of 5G it sure isn't here now or won't be for a very very very long time if ever. Unless somethings changed, 5G doesn't have the range for rural areas....
    That is only true for mmWave spectrum. 5G, on its own, does not change the propagation of radio signals.

    What Verizon has done to claim Nationwide 5G is to share the same spectrum that LTE uses with DSS. It will have the same range and availability as LTE. It will also have about the same speed. Verizon does not have any new spectrum to use for 5G for a year or so.

    This is primarily a marketing exercise. T-Mobile announced nationwide* 5G last December. AT&T announced theirs a few weeks ago. Verizon needed to be able to use "Nationwide 5G" in their advertising tagline.

    *Nationwide is a marketing term that is defined by their trade organization. It just means that a minimum of 200 million users are covered over widespread areas of the country. The US population is 328 million. A lot of people can be uncovered and they can still claim nationwide.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric The Duke View Post
    Really? It's no faster than 4g?
    Right now, the carriers aren't dedicating large amounts of lowband to 5g since they still need to support the vast majority of their customers who have LTE phones. They will adjust as necessary.
    iPhone 12 Pro is my current primary phone. Not yet signed up for 5G.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobdevnul View Post
    That is only true for mmWave spectrum. 5G, on its own, does not change the propagation of radio signals.
    People have to remember that mmwave is in its infancy in terms of the tech so advances will be made creating a larger coverage area using repeaters and other tech that is only being experimented with now.

    https://www.lightreading.com/5g/us-c.../d/d-id/764017

    Ericsson, Qualcomm Technologies and U.S. Cellular today announced that the companies have successfully achieved the first extended range 5G NR millimeter Wave (mmWave) data call in the U.S. on a commercial network.

    The extended-range data call milestone was completed in Janesville, Wisconsin, over a more than 5km distance with speeds greater than 100Mbps. This achievement redefines the perception of 5G mmWave spectrum as an urban- or high-density-only deployment technology and offers new opportunities to use current infrastructure for broader 5G coverage.

    The milestone was achieved by applying extended-range software to commercial Ericsson hardware – including AIR 5121 and Baseband 6630 – and a 5G CPE device powered by the Snapdragon X55 5G Modem-RF System with the Qualcomm QTM527 mmWave antenna module.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 10mm View Post
    mmWave 5G is UWB (n260,n261) and coverage is getting better. Rain drops and puting your hand between the phone and 5G node doesn't block the signal anymore. Some users have seen coverage beyond a half a mile in some areas so very promising. Sub-6 GHz is low and mid band 5G(n2,n5,n41,n66,n71) and is similar to the characteristics of LTE.
    You mean technology advances and becomes better? You don't say. Why don't the haters know this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kevink1 View Post
    Right now, the carriers aren't dedicating large amounts of lowband to 5g since they still need to support the vast majority of their customers who have LTE phones. They will adjust as necessary.
    unfortunately T-Mobile is. Most of their lowband was taken form 4G and moved to 5G

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