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Thread: WISPs Get CBRS Range as Great as Six Miles at 100 Mbps Speeds

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    WISPs Get CBRS Range as Great as Six Miles at 100 Mbps Speeds

    For those that think CBRS was useless for rural areas. Definitely would have been a boon for Verizon's fixed 4G product which caps speed at 50 Mbps( but says to expect 25 Mbps most of the time ) and limits video to 1080p

    Some wireless internet providers (WISPs) are seeing fixed wireless speeds of at least 100 Mbps in rural areas over distances as great as six miles using CBRS spectrum. Of two WISPs on a webcast with press and analysts today, Watch Communications – a WISP operating in several midwestern states – is seeing the greatest CBRS range.

    The company sees 100 Mbps speeds “as far as six miles very reliably,” said Chris Daniels, Watch Communications CEO.

    https://www.telecompetitor.com/wisps-get-cbrs-range-as-great-as-six-miles-at-100-mbps-speeds/

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    Not too bad; even the rural sites here in eastern Iowa, there's a few areas hilly enough so RF shadow from a hill blocks a closer site, so a phone picks up a site from like 7 or 8 miles away; but that's at car height, a short pole (like these WISPs are using) or some rooftop install would usually get line of site to a closer site well within 5 miles.

    At present, Verizon Wireless has home internet in a few markets where they have an excess of LTE capacity ($40 for 25-50mbps service) . It would be pretty sweet if they roll out CBRS widely and rolled out some thing like the home internet plan on that.

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    Sounds great ! It’s about 3.5 miles to the nearest tower from my home, Verizon cell is the only internet option for me unless I switched to satellite and I hopefully won’t have to do that.

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    More CBRS news https://www.fiercewireless.com/tech/...er-limitations

    Pivotal Commware, the Seattle-area startup whose repeaters are being used by Verizon to boost millimeter wave (mmWave) performance, is asking for FCC permission to conduct tests of its holographic beam forming (HBF) antenna technology in the 3.5 GHz Citizens Broadband Radio Services (CBRS) band.

    This isn’t the first time Pivotal is applying its HBF to mid-band spectrum. In fact, the company’s first commercial engagements were all in sub-6 GHz bands, and the technology performs equally well in those bands. “We have always maintained development programs for the low and mid-band spectrum,” said Pivotal CEO Brian Deutsch.

    According to Deutsch, Pivotal’s work at 3.5 GHz is specifically to address the power limitations of CBRS – using HBF to help overcome similar propagation issues that exist in mmWave. Stakeholders often have complained about the power limitations of CBRS, both in the General Authorized Access (GAA) unlicensed portion of the band and the Priority Access Licenses (PALs), which were just auctioned off this past summer.

    “This ‘goldilocks’ spectrum is not without its challenges,” Deutsch said via email. “Pivotal is well positioned to understand these challenges and offer the best solutions to overcome them. This is not limited to a single operator and will be useful for both PAL and GAA CBRS spectrum and also C-band when it becomes available.”

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    Sounds useful! HBF -- holographic beam forming -- found an article that says regular cell site beamforming hardware has multiple amps and a fair bit of other hardware. It says about HBF "the entire HBF antenna is made up of a patch of printed copper circuitry, a US 10-cent impedance component that they buy off the shelf, and their ASIC."

    Rather than just a 360 degree cell, or sectors (usually 3, 4, or 6, i.e. 120 degree, 90 degree, or 60 degree sectors), this round antenna is wrapped around a post and the hardware beamforms the RF out to where it actually needs to go rather than just spraying it out across the whole sector (or whole 360 degrees). The user would have both a higher signal and lower noise level. Like 802.11ac (wifi 5)'s beamform option, and 802.11ax (wifi 6) beamforming, it allows for channel resources to be reused to send data to multiple users at once where without beamforming it could only send to one.

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