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Thread: How important is Band 48 (CBRS) support?

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    How important is Band 48 (CBRS) support?

    Asking because the 2020 iPad Pro Wi-Fi + Cellular has Band 48, but otherwise isn’t that much better than the 2018 iPad Pro.

    Will Band 48 make the difference between a usable data connection and painfully slow speeds? It does seem probable that Verizon will spend tons of money on Band 48 spectrum, and in the meantime they’re using unlicensed. Hmm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    Asking because the 2020 iPad Pro Wi-Fi + Cellular has Band 48, but otherwise isn’t that much better than the 2018 iPad Pro.

    Will Band 48 make the difference between a usable data connection and painfully slow speeds? It does seem probable that Verizon will spend tons of money on Band 48 spectrum, and in the meantime they’re using unlicensed. Hmm.
    I haven’t seen band 48 anywhere in my travels yet


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    How important is Band 48 (CBRS) support?

    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    Asking because the 2020 iPad Pro Wi-Fi + Cellular has Band 48, but otherwise isn’t that much better than the 2018 iPad Pro.

    Will Band 48 make the difference between a usable data connection and painfully slow speeds? It does seem probable that Verizon will spend tons of money on Band 48 spectrum, and in the meantime they’re using unlicensed. Hmm.
    I’m sure it will . It hasn’t been spotted much in the wild but some sites are doing 2x 3x 48 combos ( 40-60 MHz aggregated) with Bands 2 and 4. Speeds have ranged from 300-650 Mbps per reddit members

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    So... instead of 300Mbps you'll get only 120Mbps? Oh, the humanity!!!
    Those are just bragging numbers, nothing useful in real live. Streaming video over a cell connection require what... 3 Mbps? 6Mbps? 9Mbps?

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    Quote Originally Posted by SoNic67 View Post
    So... instead of 300Mbps you'll get only 120Mbps? Oh, the humanity!!!
    Those are just bragging numbers, nothing useful in real live. Streaming video over a cell connection require what... 6Mbps? 9Mbps?
    It’s called capacity sir, who cares about speeds is right but if the capacity is doubled or tripled from more spectrum, everyone wins.

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    I also wonder whether Verizon will deploy LTE on the C-Band once that auction finishes.

    Currently, LTE bands 52 (3.3 to 3.4 GHz) and 43 (3.6 to 3.8 GHz) are specified for the C-Band.

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    How important is Band 48 (CBRS) support?

    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    I also wonder whether Verizon will deploy LTE on the C-Band once that auction finishes.

    Currently, LTE bands 52 (3.3 to 3.4 GHz) and 43 (3.6 to 3.8 GHz) are specified for the C-Band.

    I’m sure C band will be deployed on 5G . T-Mobile has made it clear they plan to deploy 100 MHz of n41 along with 2-3 carriers of band 41 on LTE.

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    Yes but will C-Band ONLY be deployed on 5G?

    Especially if they walk away with a huge treasure trove of C-Band, Verizon might allocate 20 or 40 MHz for an LTE capacity boost.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    Yes but will C-Band ONLY be deployed on 5G?

    Especially if they walk away with a huge treasure trove of C-Band, Verizon might allocate 20 or 40 MHz for an LTE capacity boost.
    Perhaps they’ll do both for a time until more people move onto 5G. There are no rules in the C band auction as to how much spectrum a carrier can purchase. Therefore if I was Verizon ? I’d shoot for 180-200 MHz of C band nationwide. That would put them on parity with the new T-Mobile. If AT&at grabbed say 80-100 MHz , that would even out all the carriers in the spectrum department

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    We gotta remember that LTE, which literally stands for Long Term Evolution, is not going away anytime soon. It won't be replaced like 1G, 2G, and 3G were for five main reasons:

    1. DSS/Dynamic Spectrum Sharing will make it practical to keep LTE active because it won't need to be refarmed
    2. LTE devices are simply cheaper to design & produce, and will remain that way for a long time
    3. Many, MANY more Internet-of-Things devices, connected cars, etc have LTE now than there were 3G data devices last time around, which means it would be far more logistically difficult to sunset LTE in a similar timeline
    4. 5G is only incrementally more spectrally efficient than LTE, which means carriers don't stand to gain much extra capacity by phasing out LTE
    5. LTE and 5G can be aggregated by user equipment for simultaneous use; cross-generational aggregation is new and wasn't possible with 1G, 2G, or 3G, for which spectral allocations were utterly wasted without legacy devices to use them vs. now, when modern devices can use both the newest network and the legacy network at the same time


    LTE is going to function like foundational infrastructure, whereas 3G has been functioning like an emergency backup. I personally will be surprised if I see any carrier begin sunsetting LTE any sooner than circa 2040, when 6G has been fully built out and is so much more spectrally efficient than 4G LTE that the phaseout is truly justified.

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    Band 48 is CBRS. Verizon has said CBRS will initially be for 4G and eventually move to 5G also. I assume using DSS. C-Band will be for 5G only there is a band n77 that covers the frequency range though I don't know if there will be one specific to what's being auctioned as band 77 covers 3300 GHz to 4200 GHz and I'm not sure if the FCC will want radios on US phones to be more narrowly tailored for the 3700 GHz to 3980 GHz the C-Band in the US will use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fgpalm View Post
    I haven’t seen band 48 anywhere in my travels yet


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    CBRS just got the OK to use just about a couple of months ago.

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    What's the difference between CBRS and C-Band? I thought the names were interchangeable.

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    The C-Band (typically defined as ~3.7 to 8 GHz) is either adjacent to or a superset of the CBRS band (3.55 GHz to 3.7 GHz), depending on whom you ask and how strict their definitions are. The C-Band is very broad and even includes 5 GHz Wi-Fi, for example; it’s more like a class of frequencies instead of its own distinct band, much like how “millimeter wave” refers to the entire 24/30 to 300 GHz range and is often treated like a monolithic band instead of the vast swath of smaller bands it actually is.

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    Ah ok, thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    The C-Band (typically defined as ~3.7 to 8 GHz) is either adjacent to or a superset of the CBRS band (3.55 GHz to 3.7 GHz), depending on whom you ask and how strict their definitions are. The C-Band is very broad and even includes 5 GHz Wi-Fi, for example; it’s more like a class of frequencies instead of its own distinct band, much like how “millimeter wave” refers to the entire 24/30 to 300 GHz range and is often treated like a monolithic band instead of the vast swath of smaller bands it actually is.
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