Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 26 of 26

Thread: Microsoft and T-Mobile partner to offer connected laptops to schools

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    322
    Device(s)
    Samsung S9+
    Carrier(s)
    Total Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by elecconnec View Post
    Yup. And therein lies the problem. It's great if Microsoft wants to play sugar daddy and give out a bunch of hardware, but Microsoft (like Google) has a long history of launching pilot programs and then pulling the plug when the program doesn't do what they want or need it to do (or when a new department head moves in and says "why the f--- are we funding this?")
    Satya Nadella is very smart. This is not Windows Mobile all over again. Windows and Office provide a great revenue stream but Microsoft's real mission now is to compete for cloud based business against Google, Amazon, and IBM. Apple is not interested in selling cloud services to business and industry.

    Microsoft has a good story for promoting Windows to schools because that's what almost all the students will be using when they enter college, especially if they are going into engineering, science, business, or medicine. And you can be sure that the school initiatives they are promoting are heavily dependent on their own cloud. The cost of that hardware is negligible in the scheme of things.

    Chromebooks are inexpensive and that's really their only selling point. iPads and Macs are expensive and an iPad, while okay for educational purposes, isn't something that the students are going to use in their careers very much. iPads are great for web browsing, content consumption, and for custom educational apps but the downside is that students view them more as entertainment devices and a lot of parents are not too thrilled about their kids getting more iPad screen time. A Chromebook is sufficiently boring that the students won't become addicted to it.

    When my children were in grade school in Toronto the school used Macs, not iPads. It was okay but they could not work on their projects at home because we had no Mac, and their classmates also had no Macs. I thought about getting a Mac Mini but decided that it would not be a good idea.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles/Canada
    Posts
    11,459
    Device(s)
    LG G7 (T-Mobile), iPhone 8 (AT&T)
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile, AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianAngela View Post
    Satya Nadella is very smart. This is not Windows Mobile all over again. Windows and Office provide a great revenue stream but Microsoft's real mission now is to compete for cloud based business against Google, Amazon, and IBM. Apple is not interested in selling cloud services to business and industry.

    Microsoft has a good story for promoting Windows to schools because that's what almost all the students will be using when they enter college, especially if they are going into engineering, science, business, or medicine. And you can be sure that the school initiatives they are promoting are heavily dependent on their own cloud. The cost of that hardware is negligible in the scheme of things.

    Chromebooks are inexpensive and that's really their only selling point. iPads and Macs are expensive and an iPad, while okay for educational purposes, isn't something that the students are going to use in their careers very much. iPads are great for web browsing, content consumption, and for custom educational apps but the downside is that students view them more as entertainment devices and a lot of parents are not too thrilled about their kids getting more iPad screen time. A Chromebook is sufficiently boring that the students won't become addicted to it.

    When my children were in grade school in Toronto the school used Macs, not iPads. It was okay but they could not work on their projects at home because we had no Mac, and their classmates also had no Macs. I thought about getting a Mac Mini but decided that it would not be a good idea.
    In general, I am glad that Microsoft started focusing on the Cloud vs. OS + Apps. Apple, unfortunately is primarily still in that realm, partially due to its closed ecosystem. Similarly, Apple doesn't have any 'true' business configurations (i.e. LDAP controls). Apple has been more aimed towards media/art communities and those that enjoy the simplicity of the OS and maintenance vs. Windows (partially due to bundled OS by manufacturers).
    I will agree that many more science/engineering apps are on Windows than Mac. Similarly, many at the true engineering level were originally designed on *nix OS's due to limitations in Windows and Apple.

    I actually worked in engineering departments at various locations using both. QNX was better at handling mission critical (that good Canadian OS). Similarly, at GM, much of the infra was SGI/HPUX/Sun/DEC (even X-11 terminals) on the plant floor, due to the robustness of the OS and hardware in general. I actually worked on a project tranferring NASTRAN/Unigraphics from HPUX workstations to HP-Windows workstations. Biggest reasons was cost and deskspace. Having 2 workstations vs. 1. Similarly, HPUX D and J class workstations were quite expensive, but robust as hell. Windows has matured, but also filled itself with ADHD eye-candy.

    If you have everything you want / need in a Windows station, moving to a Mac won't help... maybe a step back. I was personally tired of the various issues that I had on Windows, and 8/10 didn't help, but made it worse. Schools here do have 'some' Windows computers, but not much. They are there for ... applications, and items that you can't have on a Chromebook (too restrictive, for my use).

    Macs are a bit on the expensive side for what you get - which is one of the reasons I'm not a huge Apple fan to begin with. I am going to attempt to install RH7 on Virtualbox on a Lenovo Laptop to see how well the stylus/gestures work. Just to note for those that want Mac on Windows OS (Virtualbox) - you'll need an Intel CPU - AMD won't work.
    AT&T... your world, throttled.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles/Canada
    Posts
    11,459
    Device(s)
    LG G7 (T-Mobile), iPhone 8 (AT&T)
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile, AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianAngela View Post
    It's not just "legacy style" apps. It's almost all the engineering applications that we use. They don't do OS-X versions or Linux versions. Sure you can run a Virtual Machine or Bootcamp to get Windows on a Mac, but the Mac hardware is also less fully featured.

    The high-end Windows 2 in 1 machines can easily cost more than a Macbook, but they are much more functional with a pen, touch screen, integrated LTE modem, HDMI and USB-A ports. No need for a bagful of dongles or for a separate hotspot or for tethering to a phone.
    I tend to agree on the hardware bit. Personally, I prefer having a single USB-C than much of the proprietary charger cords that exist today. Also, I don't want an integrated LTE modem (can WiFi to my cell hotspot, and replace as needed). I will agree that almost all Mac hardware is 1-2 years (sometimes 4) out of date.

    I have actually run Windows 10 in Virtualbox on my Mac. This day and age, literally all OS's can be virtualized or installed on almost any hardware. Out of the 3 OS's (Windows / OS-X / Linux), Linux has been the most reliable and best performing. The only people at the company that I work at the use Windows are those that use business apps specifically for Windows. Developers typically won't touch it, as it's a pain to convert everything from Mac/*nix file structure to Windows. Windows at least has put in a Ubuntu subsystem to help this .. a bit.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    1,692
    Device(s)
    Any Windows Phones!
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianAngela View Post
    Satya Nadella is very smart. This is not Windows Mobile all over again. Windows and Office provide a great revenue stream but Microsoft's real mission now is to compete for cloud based business against Google, Amazon, and IBM. Apple is not interested in selling cloud services to business and industry.

    Microsoft has a good story for promoting Windows to schools because that's what almost all the students will be using when they enter college, especially if they are going into engineering, science, business, or medicine. And you can be sure that the school initiatives they are promoting are heavily dependent on their own cloud. The cost of that hardware is negligible in the scheme of things.

    Chromebooks are inexpensive and that's really their only selling point. iPads and Macs are expensive and an iPad, while okay for educational purposes, isn't something that the students are going to use in their careers very much. iPads are great for web browsing, content consumption, and for custom educational apps but the downside is that students view them more as entertainment devices and a lot of parents are not too thrilled about their kids getting more iPad screen time. A Chromebook is sufficiently boring that the students won't become addicted to it.

    When my children were in grade school in Toronto the school used Macs, not iPads. It was okay but they could not work on their projects at home because we had no Mac, and their classmates also had no Macs. I thought about getting a Mac Mini but decided that it would not be a good idea.
    Right, but if as you say, Microsoft is moving towards Microsoft software and services in the cloud (or on any device), I'm not sure how passing out Windows *devices* supports a cloud strategy other than tangentially.

    Seems to me, the educational play would be to give free or discounted Office/OneDrive *licenses* to students. An Office 365 Personal license (normally $69/year) includes the use of Office (for computers), Office Mobile (for tablets and phones) and Office Live (Office in the cloud accessed from any browser) plus 1TB of OneDrive storage. MS already offers a 4-year license to college students for $99 (though both my college-aged children get them for free as part of their universities' MS licensing.)

    I'm all for MS and T-Mo throwing hardware and service at schools, but I don't see how that fits into any cloud strategy you're discussing. This seems more of the same standard PC/Windows/Office play MS has been at for years.



    Sent from my moto x4 using Tapatalk
    --
    Todd Allcock, Microsoft MVP: Mobile Devices 2007-2011

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    322
    Device(s)
    Samsung S9+
    Carrier(s)
    Total Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by formercanuck View Post
    In general, I am glad that Microsoft started focusing on the Cloud vs. OS + Apps. Apple, unfortunately is primarily still in that realm, partially due to its closed ecosystem. Similarly, Apple doesn't have any 'true' business configurations (i.e. LDAP controls). Apple has been more aimed towards media/art communities and those that enjoy the simplicity of the OS and maintenance vs. Windows (partially due to bundled OS by manufacturers).
    Apple wants to be a consumer electronics company. It's what they are good at. They aren't trying to get back into the networking business, and they have no incentive to open their own cloud and sell services to other companies.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    322
    Device(s)
    Samsung S9+
    Carrier(s)
    Total Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by elecconnec View Post
    Right, but if as you say, Microsoft is moving towards Microsoft software and services in the cloud (or on any device), I'm not sure how passing out Windows *devices* supports a cloud strategy other than tangentially.

    Seems to me, the educational play would be to give free or discounted Office/OneDrive *licenses* to students. An Office 365 Personal license (normally $69/year) includes the use of Office (for computers), Office Mobile (for tablets and phones) and Office Live (Office in the cloud accessed from any browser) plus 1TB of OneDrive storage. MS already offers a 4-year license to college students for $99 (though both my college-aged children get them for free as part of their universities' MS licensing.)

    I'm all for MS and T-Mo throwing hardware and service at schools, but I don't see how that fits into any cloud strategy you're discussing. This seems more of the same standard PC/Windows/Office play MS has been at for years.



    Sent from my moto x4 using Tapatalk
    The details aren't clear, but I'd guess that Office 365 and cloud storage are part of the program. Maybe if a student misbehaves then they are forced to use Bing.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles/Canada
    Posts
    11,459
    Device(s)
    LG G7 (T-Mobile), iPhone 8 (AT&T)
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile, AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianAngela View Post
    Apple wants to be a consumer electronics company. It's what they are good at. They aren't trying to get back into the networking business, and they have no incentive to open their own cloud and sell services to other companies.
    Generally... I agree. Microsoft has come into it as well (cloud is their biggest business, however), with the Surface. I do think that Apple's long term strategy will require them to be more things than just a different closed ecosystem.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    322
    Device(s)
    Samsung S9+
    Carrier(s)
    Total Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by formercanuck View Post
    Generally... I agree. Microsoft has come into it as well (cloud is their biggest business, however), with the Surface. I do think that Apple's long term strategy will require them to be more things than just a different closed ecosystem.
    Maybe, but if you recall when they opened up the Mac market to clones it didn't work out well. They can make plenty of money with their current strategy. They seem to have zero interest in "the Cloud" or IOT, beyond using their own cloud for their own hardware.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    322
    Device(s)
    Samsung S9+
    Carrier(s)
    Total Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by formercanuck View Post
    I tend to agree on the hardware bit. Personally, I prefer having a single USB-C than much of the proprietary charger cords that exist today. Also, I don't want an integrated LTE modem (can WiFi to my cell hotspot, and replace as needed). I will agree that almost all Mac hardware is 1-2 years (sometimes 4) out of date.

    I have actually run Windows 10 in Virtualbox on my Mac. This day and age, literally all OS's can be virtualized or installed on almost any hardware. Out of the 3 OS's (Windows / OS-X / Linux), Linux has been the most reliable and best performing. The only people at the company that I work at the use Windows are those that use business apps specifically for Windows. Developers typically won't touch it, as it's a pain to convert everything from Mac/*nix file structure to Windows. Windows at least has put in a Ubuntu subsystem to help this .. a bit.
    You can have a USB-C charging port but still have some USB-A ports, an HDMI port, and an SD card reader. I just don't like a lot of dongles, though at least you can buy one hub with all the ports you need. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075FZ43MD

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles/Canada
    Posts
    11,459
    Device(s)
    LG G7 (T-Mobile), iPhone 8 (AT&T)
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile, AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianAngela View Post
    You can have a USB-C charging port but still have some USB-A ports, an HDMI port, and an SD card reader. I just don't like a lot of dongles, though at least you can buy one hub with all the ports you need. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075FZ43MD
    I don't like the dongles myself. I do understand the sort of simplicity (Apple is cringeworthy at this - as it removes many items to sell... other items like 3.5mm headphone jack) - making devices not able to charge while using a headphone, and having to go bluetooth or Apple lightning (ugh).
    I do have a multi-port, as I have 2 32" 2k screens attached to my laptop, as well as a YubiKey, USB headset.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles/Canada
    Posts
    11,459
    Device(s)
    LG G7 (T-Mobile), iPhone 8 (AT&T)
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile, AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianAngela View Post
    Maybe, but if you recall when they opened up the Mac market to clones it didn't work out well. They can make plenty of money with their current strategy. They seem to have zero interest in "the Cloud" or IOT, beyond using their own cloud for their own hardware.
    The only 'cloud' bits that Apple is interested - typically is data mining. I personally think that they are at a crossroad. They've milked out much of what they can out of iPhones. Macbooks aren't the big deal they were - and I agree that they attempted to push iPad 'AND' Macbook vs. one that does both, which may end up having people go to Windows.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-20-2017, 05:51 PM
  2. Need Help: Garmin Mobile XT 5.0 connecting GPS to BJII
    By dmd1272 in forum Windows Mobile Standard (Smartphone)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-30-2008, 08:45 AM
  3. Using 8100 to connect laptop to $5 mobile web...HELP
    By cgg3258 in forum Feature Phones
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-29-2006, 08:30 PM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-18-2003, 03:21 AM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-18-2003, 07:24 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks