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Thread: Amazon's plans and looking forward

  1. #91
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    the pin dropping goes back to their long distance carrier business, back before most people here were born.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    While I agree with most of what you posted, I don't understand how "taxpayers pay" in the event of bankruptcy. They aren't General Motors or Morgan Stanley. Has the government guaranteed a bunch of their loans? I don't get it.
    Too Big To Fail is a status that can only be conferred by the U.S. Government and or the Federal Reserve to an entity that is near, at or in Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

    Should the 14 Attorneys General be successful in stopping the buyout, I do not know what happens next. I am not a prophet. I do, however, think that Masayoshi Son has a Plan B and a Plan C. It is difficult to have a net worth of $23 +/- billion without a plan.

    Should Plan B or C result in Chapter 11 bankruptcy, I believe that the 14 Attorneys General will press for Too Big To Fail. This would be in keeping with the reasoning for the AGs lawsuits: Too Big To Merge, therefore, Too Big To Fail. When and what were the conditions surrounding the last time you heard a politician/attorney admit to a mistake?

    In the instance that Sprint files Chapter 11, without TBTF, there are transaction costs (the entirety of the bankruptcy, from first court session to the last court session), lost tax revenue and Federal oversight costs that will impact and be borne by the taxpayers.

  3. #93
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    Thanks for the clarification but I seriously doubt that Sprint would ever be considered To Big To Fail. With three much stronger companies providing essentially the same service, no known critical national security contracts and foreign ownership, Sprint's bankruptcy would most likely proceed through the courts, in the normal way. IMHO.
    Donald Newcomb

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenmule View Post
    出る釘は打たれる
    Deru kugi wa utareru.
    Translation: The nail that sticks out gets hammered down.

    Ancient Japanese proverb.

    Sprint is the nail sticking out in Softbank's portfolio. When Softbank bought Sprint in 2013, they infused $5 billion in cash into Sprint for working capital. Softbank/Masayoshi Son cannot allow the Sprint nail to stick out any longer. One way or the other, that nail is going to get hammered down.

    Sprint has had 5+ years to show some semblance of a turn around. There is none in sight.

    Sprint has lost about 1% market share of the postpaid phone market simultaneously being the low price carrier.

    When you are the low price leader and you are losing market share, and everyone knows that you are losing market share, then no one else cares what you price is. Sprint has multiple other issues.

    People seem to forget that VZW, AT&T and Sprint all trace there history back to the turn of the 20th century, therefore they all had an indigenous/native market to build on.

    T-Mobile started without the benefit of having been a known entity for 100 years; a benefit that VZW, AT&T, and Sprint all have. Now, Sprint is 75% the size of T-Mobile.

    The Sprint brand has very little value and that's why i doubt you will see that name after the buyout.

    Why let Sprint go into bankruptcy, renege on most or all of there debt and have taxpayers pay for their bad management when T-mobile has assessed the risks and made the eyes wide open conscious choice that they will buy them?

    Many times, people use the terms "competitor" and "alternate choice" synonymously, when they are not interchangeable. Sprint is merely the fourth choice on the list of four.

    The suggestion that Sprint puts downward price pressure on VZW, or AT&T or T-Mobile is like suggesting that HTC puts downward price pressure on Apple, or that K-Mart/Sears Holdings puts downward price pressure on Wal-Mart or that Ford put downward price pressure on Mercedes-Benz, BMW and Lexus.

    No rational company looks at the price leader in the market losing market share and says, that's the way we should go or that how we should do it
    You're downward price pressure comparisons are quite frankly comical and flawed.

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

  5. #95
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    Merger approved. On to the next level. This deal is going to be very good for competition and the American consumer.

    Sent from my F1 using HoFo mobile app

  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by cellphone-guy View Post
    Merger approved. On to the next level. This deal is going to be very good for competition and the American consumer.

    Sent from my F1 using HoFo mobile app
    LOL , I agree .

    Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    Thanks for the clarification but I seriously doubt that Sprint would ever be considered To Big To Fail. With three much stronger companies providing essentially the same service, no known critical national security contracts and foreign ownership, Sprint's bankruptcy would most likely proceed through the courts, in the normal way. IMHO.
    "Too big to fail" is a justification for Chicken Littles to justify corporate welfare. And it ends up encouraging risky behavior (and this failure), since the "too big to fail" policies remove the negative results which would naturally discourage bad behavior.

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by cellphone-guy View Post
    Merger approved. On to the next level. This deal is going to be very good for competition and the American consumer.

    Sent from my F1 using HoFo mobile app
    Once we an get past the frivolous obstruction being done by Democratic Party activists abusing the power of their AG offices to try to better their political party without regard to public interest.

  9. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotABiot View Post
    "Too big to fail" is a justification for Chicken Littles to justify corporate welfare. And it ends up encouraging risky behavior (and this failure), since the "too big to fail" policies remove the negative results which would naturally discourage bad behavior.
    Ben Bernanke,Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors from 2006 to 2014, wrote the definition of "Too Big To Fail" that became the precedent that became the policy of the current dat Federal reserve. Here is the link:https://www.federalreserve.gov/newse...e20100902a.htm

    Scroll down about 2/3 of the way and you will read the actual words too big to fail.

    More thaf that, however perhaps this is really the problem:

    Independent agencies of the United States federal government are those agencies that exist outside of the federal executive branch . More specifically, the term is used to describe agencies that, while constitutionally part of the executive branch, are independent of presidential control, usually because the president's power to dismiss the agency head or a member is limited.

    Unelected bureaucrats making policy, mandates and law with impunity and without recourse to the US citizens.
    Here is an idea of how many of such agencies exist:

    African Development Foundation
    Central Intelligence Agency
    Commodity Futures Trading Commission
    Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
    Consumer Products Safety Commision
    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board
    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
    Export-Import Bank of the United States
    Farm Credit Administration
    Federal Communications Commission
    Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
    Federal Election Commission
    Federal Housing Finance Agency
    Federal Labor Relations Authority
    Federal Maritime Commission
    Federal Mediation & Conciliation Service
    Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission
    The Federal Reserve System
    Federal Trade Commission
    General Services Administration
    Inter-American Foundation
    Merit Systems Protection Board
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration
    National Archives and Records Administration
    National Council on Disabilities
    National Credit Union Administration
    National Endowment for the Arts
    National Indian Gaming Commission
    National Labor Relations Board
    National Mediation Board
    National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak)
    National Science Foundation
    National Transportation Safety Board
    Nuclear Regulatory Commission
    Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board
    Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission
    Office of Government Ethics
    Office of Personnel Management
    Office of Special Counsel
    Overseas Private Investment Council
    Peace Corps
    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation
    Postal Regulatory Commission
    Railroad Retirement Board
    Security and Exchange Commission
    Selective Service Board
    Small Business Administration
    Smithsonian Institution
    Social Security Administration
    Social Security Advisory Board
    Taxpayer Advocacy Panel
    Tennessee Valley Authority
    U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)
    United States Commission on Civil Rights
    United States International Trade Commission
    United States Postal Service
    United States Trade and Development Agency

  10. #100
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    Exactly. And then there are Fannie and Freddie, without which there would have been no housing crises a decade ago. The person at the top of Fannie was rewarded with tens of millions of dollars.

  11. #101
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    And if the people down the food chain, you know, the lowly CFOs and such, get the silly notion that they ought to do the right thing, there is always suicide:

    https://money.cnn.com/2009/04/22/new...ily_newsletter

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