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Thread: Verizon Announces 20 More 5G Cities for April 25th & Samsung Galaxy S10 5G Preorders

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    Verizon Announces 20 More 5G Cities for April 25th & Samsung Galaxy S10 5G Preorders

    https://www.verizon.com/about/news/v...d-network-year

    Verizon names 20 more U.S. cities where customers will get 5G Ultra Wideband network this year; preorder for the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G starts April 25

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    5G to enable real-time experiences for customers

    S10 5G
    Preorder the Galaxy S10 5G, exclusively on Verizon for a limited time, starting today and get up to $650 off
    Verizon names 20 additional 5G cities on the heels of turning on 5G in Chicago and Minneapolis
    For a limited time, get Verizon 5G Ultra Wideband access, a $10-per-month value, included in Above and Beyond Unlimited plans

    Get a free Samsung VIP Kit when you preorder a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G
    NEW YORK – The 5G revolution continues. Starting today, April 25, Verizon consumer and business customers can preorder the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G — Samsung’s first 5G smartphone in the U.S. — available exclusively on Verizon for a limited time. In addition, Verizon revealed the names of 20 additional cities where customers will get access to its 5G Ultra Wideband network in 2019, with more to come throughout the year. These cities join Chicago and Minneapolis, the world’s first cities to get Verizon’s 5G Ultra Wideband mobility service.

    Verizon 5G: Be first to real time
    Verizon, today, unveiled the names of 20 U.S. cities that will get 5G Ultra Wideband service in 2019. They are: Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dallas, Des Moines, Denver, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Little Rock, Memphis, Phoenix, Providence, San Diego, Salt Lake City and Washington DC1.

    Verizon previously announced it would deploy 5G in select areas of more than 30 U.S. cities in 2019, and will roll out its 5G Home broadband internet service in some of these markets, as well. Additional 5G Ultra Wideband cities will be announced later this year.

    5G Ultra Wideband technology uses new radio technology and device hardware to deliver advanced capabilities to consumers and businesses. When customers move outside Verizon’s 5G Ultra Wideband coverage area, the Galaxy S10 5G hands off the signal to Verizon’s 4G LTE network, the nation’s largest 4G LTE network.

    “The Galaxy S10 5G on Verizon’s 5G Ultra Wideband network will give our customers access to incredible speeds and the latest and greatest streaming, augmented-reality, gaming, and consumer and business applications that bring us into a future powered by 5G,” said Ronan Dunne, executive vice president and president of Verizon’s consumer group. “With the rollout of 5G in more than 30 markets by the end of 2019 and the upcoming launch of Samsung’s first 5G Galaxy smartphone, we are pulling further ahead of the competition in 5G.”

    The most powerful Galaxy S10 on Verizon 5G
    Available exclusively on Verizon for a limited time, the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G smartphone puts the power, speed and connectivity of Verizon’s 5G Ultra Wideband network directly into the hands of consumers and businesses. Verizon’s 5G Ultra Wideband network provides download speeds that are significantly faster than 4G LTE with increased bandwidth capacity meaning more users are able to use more data in the same location. That means access to speeds previously unheard of from a mobile network that will change the way you use your smartphone for work, play and everything in between2.

    “5G speeds will unlock a new world of possibilities for consumers and businesses — they’ll be able to stream, download, browse, and share like they never have before,” said YH Eom, president and CEO, Samsung Electronics America. “From the display, to the cameras, to the speed, the Galaxy S10 5G is the most powerful Galaxy S series device we’ve ever made, and it’s designed and engineered for consumers to get the very best from their wireless network.”

    The Galaxy S10 5G features a stunning 6.7” cinematic Dynamic AMOLED display, so you can immerse yourself in a whole new way. It also features the Galaxy S series’ most advanced, pro-grade camera system — six lenses, including a 3D Depth Sensing camera which uses Time of Flight technology to let you capture video with a stunning blur effect.

    A powerful 4,500 mAh all day intelligent battery3 optimizes usage based on how you live, to deliver intuitive peak performance throughout the day. And the Galaxy S10 5G comes with two storage options — 256GB and 512GB — so you can download movies, TV and photos at hyperfast speeds and store them all at your fingertips.

    5G plans, pricing and availability
    Verizon has two great deals to make it easier to upgrade to 5G. New and existing customers can trade in an eligible smartphone and save up to $450. What’s more, you can get an additional $200 prepaid Mastercard if you switch to Verizon, purchase a Galaxy S10 5G on device payment plan and sign up for Verizon Unlimited4. Finally, customers that preorder a Galaxy S10 5G are eligible for a free VIP Kit that includes a pair of Samsung Galaxy Buds and a Samsung Wireless Charging Battery Pack5.

    Verizon 5G Ultra Wideband is available only on Above and Beyond Unlimited plans with a 5G phone. For a limited time, the Verizon 5G Ultra Wideband $10 access fee is waived — a savings of $10 a month6. Both plans include unlimited 5G Ultra Wideband data, hotspot and 4K HD video streaming (on 4K-capable devices) when you are in 5G Ultra Wideband coverage areas7. Business customers are also eligible to preorder the Galaxy S10 5G. Information on preorder pricing and offers for business customers is available here.

    The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G will be available for preorder starting 5:55 am ET on April 25 in Crown Silver and Verizon-exclusive Majestic Black. The 256GB Galaxy S10 5G is $54.16 per month for 24 months on Verizon Device Payment (0% APR; $1,299.99 retail) and the 512GB Galaxy S10 5G is $58.33 per month for 24 months on Verizon Device Payment (0% APR; $1,399.99 retail). The Galaxy S10 5G will be available in Verizon stores on May 16.

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    That’s a pretty hefty price tag.


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    I can't see people jumping all over this at those prices either especially since carriers including Verizon may be building these networks out with as of now unequipped spectrum that these phones may not support.


    A bright spot for all this is dynamic spectrum sharing that'll allow existing spectrum to be shared for 5G on a dynamic basis on existing 4G equipment that is 5G ready upgraded to 5G through software. This is apparently a solely Ericsson innovation.

    https://www.rcrwireless.com/20190425...n-20-5g-cities

    Vestberg also said that the company is anticipating the use of dynamic spectrum sharing as part of its 5G strategy — so that specific spectrum bands do not have to be allocated to specific technology generations, as has typically been the case in wireless technology. He said that the technology won’t be available until next year and that Verizon is in early conversations with chipset and equipment vendors, but added that “all spectrum will be exposed to dynamic spectrum sharing over time.”
    https://www.lightreading.com/mobile/.../d/d-id/750448

    The Journey From 4G to 5G Will Begin With 1 Millisecond
    Mike Dano Editorial Director, 5G & Mobile Strategies
    3/26/2019


    If every second counts, then, with 5G, every millisecond will count. That's because the move from 4G to 5G will happen dynamically, and it will be counted in milliseconds.

    Both AT&T and Verizon confirmed that they're going to migrate traffic from their current 4G LTE networks to their nascent 5G networks by using a technology called "dynamic spectrum sharing." This technology essentially will allow 4G and 5G users to take turns using the exact same chunk of spectrum. Initially, the line of 4G users will be much longer, so they'll take most of the turns. But as the number of 5G users grows, they'll take an increasing number of turns using a given chunk of spectrum.

    The result though will be very spectrally efficient, because no matter who is taking their turn, the spectrum will be working rather than lying fallow.

    This type of dynamic sharing is a big change from how the wireless industry transitioned from 3G to 4G. In that transition, operators had to carve out a chunk of spectrum that was dedicated to 4G, regardless of how many 4G users they actually had. And, as a result, 3G users were left with a dwindling amount of spectrum as carriers moved customers onto 4G and dedicated a growing amount of spectrum to those customers.

    "If you just have a dedicated, static system, you're just going to be inefficient," explained Mike Haberman, VP of Verizon's network engineering, in a recent interview with Light Reading. "The minute I reserve capacity for [5G] NR, I take it away from LTE."

    Haberman said that Verizon will use dynamic spectrum sharing to ease 5G customers onto its existing spectrum bands. The operator won't have to use the technology on its millimeter-wave spectrum bands because no other users are on those bands, but the operator will use it on its low- and mid-wave spectrum bands, bands that it's currently using for its LTE services.

    Dividing up the time - So how will dynamic spectrum sharing work? "It's divided in time but it's alternating in formats," Haberman explained.

    He said that, unlike Verizon's old CDMA technology, LTE is based on the time domain, which means that communications are broken down into 10 ms sections. 5G, meantime, also uses the time domain, though it is broken down into 1 ms sections. Thus, a 4G user might use a given chunk of spectrum for 10 ms, and then a 5G user will sneak into the band for 1 ms to transmit their own communications. That sharing would continue indefinitely -- and it can be dynamically adjusted based on the number of customers on either side of the 4G/5G equation.

    "So what's cool there is you can size the number of NR slots to your demand," Haberman said, adding that it's the "ultimate way to do it."

    However, Haberman cautioned that operators will need to carefully manage how such sharing is handled in cell site handoffs and in scenarios where carrier aggregation technology is used to glue together transmissions in disparate spectrum bands for faster speeds.

    Regardless, Verizon isn't the only operator planning to utilize this new transition technology.

    "Dynamic sharing just allows you to use the same spectrum for both LTE and [5G] NR," AT&T's Igal Elbaz, the operator's senior vice president of wireless technology, told Light Reading in a recent interview. "In the US, it's really important because of the fragmentation of the bands. It takes time until there's enough devices of 5G and enough adoption of 5G. At the same time, a majority of our customers on our network are on LTE. So the ability to be able to dynamically use the same [spectrum] bands for NR and LTE is really important."

    AT&T too is deploying 5G into mostly vacant millimeter-wave spectrum bands, but the operator has said that it will use its sub-6GHz spectrum holdings to deploy 5G nationwide by early next year. AT&T will also use dynamic spectrum sharing to ease its spectrum from 4G users to 5G users as it rolls out 5G and adds customers to the network.

    Launch timelines remain fuzzy
    However, neither Verizon's Haberman nor AT&T's Elbaz would say when they will introduce dynamic spectrum sharing. Indeed, Verizon hasn't provided any details about its 5G launch plans other than to say it will launch mobile 5G services in roughly 30 cities in the coming months. The operator has said that it will eventually expand 5G across all its spectrum bands, but it hasn't said when it might do that.

    That relative uncertainty hasn't stopped vendors from trumpeting the elegance of the dynamic transition from 4G to 5G.

    "Our new Spectrum Sharing solution enables service providers to intelligently, flexibly and quickly introduce and add 5G within existing 4G carriers. With this Ericsson innovation, our customers can strengthen their 5G offering while continuing to invest in 4G, with the peace of mind that those investments will pay dividends when the time comes to switch on 5G," said Ericsson's Per Narvinger in a joint announcement with Intel boasting of the companies' successful demonstration of spectrum sharing at the recent Mobile World Congress trade show in Barcelona, Spain.

    Both Haberman and Elbaz said that dynamic spectrum sharing is a part of the 5G standard and that no one vendor has a lock on the technology. Ericsson said that its spectrum sharing technology likely would be available in the second half of 2019 in North America, depending on individual customer spectrum situations. "Ericsson expects this feature to be a game changer for our customers, allowing cost-effective serving on both 4G LTE and 5G NR on the same spectrum band from the same radio," the vendor said in a statement to Light Reading.

    Ericsson, along with Nokia and Samsung, is one of the primary suppliers of 5G equipment in North America, and counts virtually all of the top operators as customers.

    Although Ericsson's availability timeframe may trail initial operator 5G launches in the US, the technology is nonetheless heralded by many in the industry as a way to ensure that both 4G networks and 5G networks can concurrently continue to provide speedy services while customers go from from one G to the next.
    https://www.fiercewireless.com/wirel...eployment-game

    Marek’s Take: Dynamic spectrum sharing may change the 5G deployment game
    by Sue Marek | Apr 19, 2019 4:12pm


    When it comes to deploying 5G, spectrum is a key differentiator for operators. And while 24 GHz millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum is currently being auctioned specifically for 5G, mid-band spectrum will be critical for operators to get widespread 5G coverage across their markets. That’s why a technology called dynamic spectrum sharing (DSS) is so compelling. This technology, which is part of the 3GPP Release 15, allows operators to dynamically allocate some of their existing 4G LTE spectrum to 5G and use existing radios (as long as they are 5G NR-capable) to deliver 5G services by deploying a software upgrade.

    DSS was explained to me this way. Without DSS, an operator that has 20 MHz of mid-band spectrum would have to split that spectrum in two. In other words, they would have to allocate 10 MHz of spectrum to 4G LTE and cram all their LTE users into that 10 MHz of spectrum. Then the remaining 10 MHz of AWS spectrum could be used for 5G, even though initially there will only be a minimal number of 5G users. With DSS, an operator doesn’t have to split that mid-band spectrum or have dedicated spectrum for either 4G LTE or 5G. Instead they can share that 20 MHz of spectrum between the two technologies.

    DSS is expected to be deployed later this year. European operator Swisscom has said that it will use DSS from Ericsson as part of its 5G deployment. Swisscom said it expects to have 90% of its population covered with 5G by year-end.

    Paul Challoner, vice president of network solutions for Ericsson North America, said that he expects “multiple large customers” to use DSS around the second half of the year. While he noted that Swisscom mentioned using DSS in its recent announcement about its 5G deployment, he said the operator isn’t necessarily going to be the first to use it.

    DSS will only work with 5G-ready equipment, so operators that haven’t upgraded their network gear in the past couple of years won’t be able to use DSS. Challoner said that most of the large operators have upgraded their networks with 5G-ready equipment, but he noted that smaller operators may need to look at DSS as an extra incentive to upgrade their networks quickly. “This is a capex friendly way to get to 5G,” he said.

    Analysts I spoke with were hesitant to call DSS a “game-changer,” but they did say that the technology will allow operators to have some flexibility in migrating to 5G. Ed Gubbins, senior analyst with GlobalData, said that the value of DSS really depends upon the operator’s spectrum assets and their 5G rollout plans. Some operators aren’t planning to use overlapping spectrum for 4G and 5G, so they won’t need DSS. He also noted that DSS is really intended to be used by each vendor’s existing 4G customers. In other words, Ericsson customers will likely use Ericsson’s DSS product and Nokia’s customers will use Nokia’s product. The same will occur with Huawei and Samsung, which also offer spectrum sharing solutions.

    Steve Scarlett, head of technology for Verizon customer business at Nokia, said that the timing of DSS deployment really depends upon the availability of 5G handsets that have the spectrum sharing capability because existing LTE handsets won’t be able to take advantage of the network upgrade, and operators need to be careful so DSS doesn’t impact existing LTE customers. “There are timing signals in LTE that can’t be messed with,” Scarlett said.

    Roaming and More

    While DSS will allow operators to expand their 5G coverage areas, experts say the real advantage to having DSS will be when operators start to upgrade their core networks to 5G. When that occurs, which will likely happen in 2020, DSS will play a role in making network slicing possible and allow operators to allocate spectrum for certain use cases.

    And Scarlett also said that he believes DSS will eventually be critical for 5G roaming because the spectrum bands where LTE is deployed are already being used globally for LTE roaming. Once 5G becomes more pervasive, operators will need to figure out a way for users to roam and still get the same 5G services.

    Some may think DSS is just be another tool in the 5G toolbox, but it certainly seems like a big step forward in how operators can migrate from one generation of technology to another. Having written about every wireless evolution from 2G upward, I find this concept pretty intriguing. I will be watching to see if it works as seamlessly as it was described to me. —Sue

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    Gee, maybe I should have kept my old Ericsson TDMA phone!

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    So, where's the list of the additional 20 cities?
    Photobucket's policy changes SUCK!

    New signature coming soon-ish...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack T. Chance View Post
    So, where's the list of the additional 20 cities?
    It's buried in there and easy to miss:
    Verizon 5G: Be first to real time
    Verizon, today, unveiled the names of 20 U.S. cities that will get 5G Ultra Wideband service in 2019. They are: Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dallas, Des Moines, Denver, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Little Rock, Memphis, Phoenix, Providence, San Diego, Salt Lake City and Washington DC1.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack T. Chance View Post
    So, where's the list of the additional 20 cities?
    From Verizon Wireless website

    Attachment 162466

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    Geez,

    Three in my state... But all 50 miles away....

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    Quote Originally Posted by flrtrader View Post
    Geez,

    Three in my state... But all 50 miles away....
    The signal only propagates 50 feet, so even if you were in one of those 3 cities it wouldn't be life changing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Morphling27 View Post
    The signal only propagates 50 feet, so even if you were in one of those 3 cities it wouldn't be life changing.
    I am glad my city made it on the map. Even though I do not have a 5G device I am hopping the back-haul will be improved on the cellular towers since their download and upload speeds are awful in Cincinnati Ohio.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Morphling27 View Post
    The signal only propagates 50 feet, so even if you were in one of those 3 cities it wouldn't be life changing.
    A bit hyperbolic. You're not getting it where the are likely to be hundreds or thousands of people 5G will work fine and when enough of those people have 5Gphones guess what that does. It FREES up 4G spectrum for everyone else. And since 4G spectrum is now freed up guess what Verizon can do? Up depri and hotspot and video streaming levels on 4G.

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    does this mean 5G is guaranteed to be NOT available in
    Chicago, New York and Los Angeles in the year 2019?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    A bit hyperbolic. You're not getting it where the are likely to be hundreds or thousands of people 5G will work fine and when enough of those people have 5Gphones guess what that does. It FREES up 4G spectrum for everyone else. And since 4G spectrum is now freed up guess what Verizon can do? Up depri and hotspot and video streaming levels on 4G.
    I get the reason and understand 5G will be good overall. It's just only launching it on the 28 or 38 GHz spectrum or whatever is literally only going to be cellular wifi.

    I think, even more than 4g or previous new techs, 5G isn't going to be seen as shattering lives outside downtown city areas for some time.

    I also have asked why each new generation makes the air interface more fragile. Why not have it built in where they can make it a solid connection but maybe less speed or less total users - covering the rocky mountains isn't population dense.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AmandaCL View Post
    does this mean 5G is guaranteed to be NOT available in
    Chicago, New York and Los Angeles in the year 2019?
    5G NR is already available in Chicago.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Morphling27 View Post
    I get the reason and understand 5G will be good overall. It's just only launching it on the 28 or 38 GHz spectrum or whatever is literally only going to be cellular wifi..
    What other spectrum should they be launching it on?

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