Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 24

Thread: Dish Continues to Whine about T-Mobile/Sprint Merger

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,742
    Device(s)
    Iphone XR
    Carrier(s)
    Tmobile
    Feedback Score
    0

    Dish Continues to Whine about T-Mobile/Sprint Merger

    Ergen will lose T-Mobile as a suitor for his squat on spectrum when the merger is approved.

    https://www.fiercewireless.com/wirel...-mobile-merger

    Dish, others make final stand against Sprint/T-Mobile merger

    by Mike Dano | Nov 1, 2018 11:09am

    The formal comment period on the proposed merger between Sprint and T-Mobile closed yesterday at the FCC, and Dish Network was among a number of entities voicing loud and stiff opposition to the transaction.

    “The proposed merger of T-Mobile and Sprint (together, the ‘Applicants’) will create a national mobile voice/broadband market controlled by three companies, lead to excessive concentration in other relevant markets, and increase prices for consumers. The Applicants have not come close to demonstrating that the merger as currently proposed would serve the public interest. In many respects, the Opposition, as well as the internal documents produced by the Applicants, set their case back significantly,” Dish wrote.

    In its 240-page filing on the topic, submitted yesterday and published in full at the end of this article, Dish outlined a lengthy argument against the proposed merger of Sprint and T-Mobile. Among many other points, Dish contended that the merger would result in price increases for customers and would not result in a significantly better network than if the two companies remained separate.

    Among Dish’s many conclusions:

    “By Facilitating Coordination, The Proposed Merger Would Have Worse Effects Than Those Of The Previously Proposed AT&T/T-Mobile Deal.”

    “Almost None Of The $43.6 Billion In Claimed Private Cost Synergies Can Be Recognized Under the Public Interest Standard.”

    “5G Deployment Is Not A Merger Benefit.”

    “The resulting benefits, if any, are dwarfed by any reasonable estimate of the merger’s price impact: higher prices, even on a per unit basis. Such price increases are clearly not in the public interest,” Dish concluded.

    Dish’s latest filing largely underscores the initial arguments the company made in August.

    Dish’s opposition to the merger of Sprint and T-Mobile is also noteworthy in light of T-Mobile’s recent call for the FCC to strip Dish of its vast spectrum holdings because Dish has no immediate plans to build out much of its spectrum.

    Dish, T-Mobile argued just last week, “intends to continue to warehouse spectrum with no benefit to consumers. The [FCC’s Wireless] Bureau should not permit Dish to succeed with its plan.”

    Nonetheless, Dish wasn’t the only entity registering its continued opposition to the proposed merger of Sprint and T-Mobile yesterday.

    “In our initial comments, we estimated that the proposed merger would result in the loss of more than 28,000 jobs," wrote the Communications Workers of America in its own filing (PDF). "CWA’s initial analysis was, if anything, too conservative. We have refined our analysis with additional data, and show in these Reply Comments that the merger is likely to eliminate 30,000 jobs.”

    Separately, the NTCA contended the merger would affect smaller, rural providers by reducing the number of companies they can roam with.

    “In response to NTCA’s concerns about the loss of focus on rural partnerships, Applicants pledge that New T-Mobile will have a roaming program that offers carriers with existing roaming agreements with either T-Mobile or Sprint ‘to determine which rates will govern their relationship with New T-Mobile,’” NTCA wrote (PDF). “However, Applicants offer no assurances that New T-Mobile will honor terms beyond rates or that agreements will be renewed upon expiration. In other words, Applicants’ only response is to promise that they will adhere to existing contracts to which they are otherwise bound in any event—hardly, a proactive program for promoting partnerships and greater coverage in rural America.”

    Similarly, the Rural Wireless Association argued the combined carrier wouldn't provide much service in rural areas. "Applicants’ rural buildout claims are not supported in the record. Applicants’ own filings show that the New T-Mobile would only provide marginally better broadband options than standalone T-Mobile in much of rural America. In fact, for the great majority of rural Americans, the level of coverage and capacity would be similar for New T-Mobile as it would be for standalone T-Mobile," the association wrote.

    And public-interest group Free Press called (PDF) the proposed transaction “despicable” and said that it would be “disastrous for the millions of people who rely on mobile broadband for access to healthcare, education, employment, news and much more. This deal would be especially harmful for low-income people and communities of color—expanding the digital divide that Chairman Ajit Pai has repeatedly said he wants to eliminate.”

    T-Mobile’s John Legere, for his part, remained optimistic about the deal during his company’s quarterly conference call with investors this week.

    “We continue to expect this merger to close in the first half of 2019. In the meantime, we look forward to continuing to work with the regulators to share our story about how this merger will be good for consumers and good for the country,” he said, according to a Seeking Alpha transcript of his remarks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    556
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by offthegrid View Post
    Ergen will lose T-Mobile as a suitor for his squat on spectrum when the merger is approved.
    But it could make Verizon or AT&T a whole lot more interested in that spectrum.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    5,030
    Device(s)
    S9
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    So what this says to me is that DISH Networks has no intention of building a new cell phone network as they have told the FCC. DISH has told the FCC that after their IoT network that uses only 2% of their spectrum is deployed they will build out a 5G Cell Phone Network. If T-Mobile and Sprint were to merge it would be the best thing for DISH Networks if they were really going to build out a new 5G Cell Phone Network that would provide less competition for DISH with only three other national networks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Gulf Coast
    Posts
    16,300
    Device(s)
    Moto G7 Power, Nexus 5X
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile, PagePlus
    Feedback Score
    0
    If Dish feels that the US needs four national networks for competition, maybe they should build one. I mean, thats what they said they were going to do. Right?
    Donald Newcomb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,692
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    If Dish feels that the US needs four national networks for competition, maybe they should build one. I mean, thats what they said they were going to do. Right?
    Exactly. Dish has an extreme lack of credibility with me. I would consider any thing they have to say to carry the same credibility as a jailhouse snitch. Hopefully the FCC weighs their arguments the same.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    5,030
    Device(s)
    S9
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    If Dish feels that the US needs four national networks for competition, maybe they should build one. I mean, thats what they said they were going to do. Right?

    As they say in Vegas: Winner winner chicken dinner. Clearly DISH Networks wants to sell their spectrum or company instead of building a new 5G Network.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,742
    Device(s)
    Iphone XR
    Carrier(s)
    Tmobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by HokieAl View Post
    But it could make Verizon or AT&T a whole lot more interested in that spectrum.
    Ergen has likely been asking too high a price or some involvement in a combine where he's in charge. There's no option for either of those things sans T-Mobile but the spectrum will end up with either Verizon or AT&T as you say but with a much lower price tag and a goodbye to Ergen in the mobile 'market'.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,499
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by HokieAl View Post
    But it could make Verizon or AT&T a whole lot more interested in that spectrum.
    After at&t got firstnet, I'm thinking only verizon would want it... but verizon also detests charlie and company, so they'll probably not make a move either lol

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    33
    Feedback Score
    0
    About 2 or 3 weeks ago I emailed the contact email (Dish's lawyer, Mr. Blum) on one of their licenses to inquire about buying one or two. No response yet...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    5,030
    Device(s)
    S9
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    Ok someone tell me how DISH can build a NB-IoT network that one tower covers 62 miles (100 km)?

    "The companies also reiterated that they have been able to validate and deploy an “extended range” network that will allow each NB-IoT tower to transmit a signal up to 100 km. That’s a key element in Dish’s strategy because it allows the company to cover huge swathes of territory without having to pay as many tower companies to install Ericsson’s radios at the top of their towers."

    Dish’s first wireless partners revealed: Ericsson and SBA

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,692
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by shilohcane View Post
    Ok someone tell me how DISH can build a NB-IoT network that one tower covers 62 miles (100 km)?
    Narrow band, low-speed, with a robust modulation that is not as susceptible to noise as what is used for our high-speed cell data. It could operate with a lower SNR which would extend the range.

    That 100 km is probably under ideal conditions - tall tower, no obstructions, subscriber equipment on flat land, etc.

    Dish is all fluff and BS.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Gulf Coast
    Posts
    16,300
    Device(s)
    Moto G7 Power, Nexus 5X
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile, PagePlus
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by bobdevnul View Post
    .....That 100 km is probably under ideal conditions - tall tower, no obstructions, subscriber equipment on flat land, etc...
    You can do a lot if you assume base station at 1000' feet and mobile side has a yagi.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,692
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    You can do a lot if you assume base station at 1000' feet and mobile side has a yagi.
    Yeah, I see some of our public infrastructure sites with Yagi's. I can pick up a neighbor's Wifi a mile away with a wok lid reflector.

    Not sure I want our sewage pumping stations to switch to NB-IoT from cells without backup generators.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,742
    Device(s)
    Iphone XR
    Carrier(s)
    Tmobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    You can do a lot if you assume base station at 1000' feet and mobile side has a yagi.
    Imagine the expense of having to install a yagi on a rooftop so your soda machine can communicate with Dish's national 5G network or better yet motorized yagis that search for signal - pole mounted on cars.

    Dish could also launch a sputnik class satellite with Ericsson painted on the side of it that passes the US every hour collecting 1k of data every day and claim it's a network.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    5,030
    Device(s)
    S9
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by bobdevnul View Post
    Narrow band, low-speed, with a robust modulation that is not as susceptible to noise as what is used for our high-speed cell data. It could operate with a lower SNR which would extend the range.

    That 100 km is probably under ideal conditions - tall tower, no obstructions, subscriber equipment on flat land, etc.

    Dish is all fluff and BS.
    It is the uplink from the NB-IoT to the tower ability to broadcast 62 miles that I am thinking about. I assume that most IoT networks the module uplinking the data to the tower is 95% of the entire broadcast. These NB-IoT modules are tiny... and low powered so a battery in a NB-IoT doesn't need to be changed every year. No one wants to climb a Wind Turbine to change a battery every month. A lot of these NB-IoT will be in weather applications mounted to normal buildings. However most IoT applications are inside building and low to the ground. Then again not sure DISH Networks really wants any NB-IoT customers since this sounds like a spectrum protection network.

    Name:  NB IoT Modules.jpg
Views: 175
Size:  116.2 KB

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Virgin Mobile to Continue Amidst T-Mobile-Sprint Merger
    By AnciusD in forum Virgin Mobile USA
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-05-2018, 01:48 PM
  2. Replies: 22
    Last Post: 09-01-2018, 08:53 AM
  3. Replies: 60
    Last Post: 07-28-2018, 07:16 PM
  4. Everything you wanted to know about windows Mobile 6.0
    By Dave Evans in forum Windows Mobile (Before 7)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-17-2007, 08:24 AM
  5. What to do about T-Mobile Rebate
    By ItsPat in forum T-Mobile
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-10-2004, 10:30 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks