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Thread: T-Mobile's John Legere Roasts Verizon's 5G Home Service Launch

  1. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by james4209 View Post
    My point exactly. Until it happens T-Mobile "intending" to do something is meaningless except to the fanboys. Although it does make for great marketing material.
    Exactly, the approval of the Sprint sale to T-Mo is in no way certain. The key hurdle is scrutiny by the DOJ Antitrust Division. They have said next to nothing that I have noticed so far. IIRC, review and a decision by DOJ is not due until sometime next year.

    It is a big hurdle to jump to remove one of four horizontal competitors from the national market. It would not surprise me at all if the DOJ sues to block the sale.

    I expect the FCC to bless the union. Antitrust is not their purview.

    Personally, I am ambivalent about it.

  2. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by james4209 View Post
    My point exactly. Until it happens T-Mobile "intending" to do something is meaningless except to the fanboys. Although it does make for great marketing material.
    Really name calling like "fanboys" is against the board rules. We get it you made your point you hate T-Mobile now stop insulting us and trying to bait people into an argument.

  3. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by shilohcane View Post
    At some point when T-Mobile has the streaming ability ready they will re-name Layer3 and make it an App like YouTubeTV, Hulu, Sling, Amazon Prime, Netflix, Playstation Vue, Philo TV or Pluto TV.
    None of those apps also own a wireless network that can deliver video content straight to consumers. They all need the customer to use a separate internet connection to view their content.

    Layer 3 (and I'm not talking about the current cable company, but the future wireless version) will be able to deliver video content straight to the customer via T-mobile's wireless spectrum. That's the big difference between Layer 3 and the apps you listed.

  4. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by shilohcane View Post
    Really name calling like "fanboys" is against the board rules. We get it you made your point you hate T-Mobile now stop insulting us and trying to bait people into an argument.
    Alright, tmo is now officially on the list to bid for high band spectrum mmwave .. sprint is not on the list


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by james4209 View Post
    My point exactly. Until it happens T-Mobile "intending" to do something is meaningless
    A $3.5 billion agreement with Ericsson to "provide T-Mobile with the latest 5G New Radio (NR) hardware and software compliant with 3GPP standards" is more than an "intending".

    https://www.ericsson.com/en/press-releases/2018/9/t-mobile-and-ericsson-sign-major-$3.5-billion-5g-agreement

    As CTO, Neville Ray stated: “While the other guys just make promises, we’re putting our money where our mouth is. "

    Once again, the facts show you to be incorrect.

  6. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by jet1000 View Post
    A $3.5 billion agreement with Ericsson to "provide T-Mobile with the latest 5G New Radio (NR) hardware and software compliant with 3GPP standards" is more than an "intending".

    https://www.ericsson.com/en/press-releases/2018/9/t-mobile-and-ericsson-sign-major-$3.5-billion-5g-agreement

    As CTO, Neville Ray stated: “While the other guys just make promises, we’re putting our money where our mouth is. "

    Once again, the facts show you to be incorrect.
    This is correct. Neither CEO Hans Vestberg (Verizon) or CEO Randall Stephenson (AT&T) would deny T-Mobile's planned efforts into the 5G race.
    “The Internet wasn’t meant to be metered in bits and bytes, so it’s insane that wireless companies are still making you buy it this way. The rate plan is dead — it’s a fossil from a time when wireless was metered by every call or text.” John Legere 1/5/2017

  7. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by james4209 View Post
    My point exactly. Until it happens T-Mobile "intending" to do something is meaningless except to the fanboys. Although it does make for great marketing material.
    Can someone ban this guy? He's just here to bash tmobile and bait people into arguments

    The board doesnt need this trash

  8. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by CircuitSwitched View Post
    Until T-Mobile has a real world product delivering near gigabit home internet, they don’t have a leg to stand on..

    John needs to worry more about how he’s going to deal with the mess that the Sprint network is, and how to market their expensive dumb dumb dumb Layer3 TV.


    Sent from my iPhone using HoFo
    Everyone is trying to figure out how to do broadband Internet, Television, and Wireless.

    AT&T used to own the cable company in my area and then sold it to Comcast and tried FTTN+copper with their U-Verse service, and it was awful. Then they ran out and bought DirecTV and also began running FTTH.

    Comcast did a deal with Verizon for wireless, but it's not great. It can be cheap, but you don't get all the benefits of Verizon and you can't yet bring your own phones except for the iPhone.

    Verizon is trying to be first with wireless broadband their "5G-TF." People can argue all day about whether or not they should be calling it 5G, but it may achieve their goal of being able to compete for the home business against AT&T and Comcast.

    T-Mobile has not even fully built out a 2G, 3G, or 4G network yet but they are already talking about their plans for 5G. The good news for T-Mobile is that what recently happened with the FCC will make placing 5G cells much easier than building towers for 2G, 3G, or 4G. You can't blame Legere for being out there dissing Verizon. He needs to try to prevent his subscribers from moving to someone elses home 5G solution before he can roll out 5G in a year or two.
    “It's best not to argue with people who are determined to lose. Once you've told them about a superior alternative, your responsibility is fulfilled and you can allow them to lose in peace.” Mark Crispin, inventor of the iMAP e-mail protocol.

  9. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    Thinking about it, the electoral college is a good analogy: a balance between covering people and covering territory. You really need both. You need to focus your efforts on where people spend most their time but also understand that people do go out in the boondocks and need some level of service when they are there.
    The issue is not so much the boondocks ("a remote rural area"), but the areas between the cities. A lot of people never go "down in the boondocks" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7EV0ozOk9I) but they do take road trips between cities. That's where Verizon, and to a lesser extent, AT&T are preferable. They have made an effort to cover major freeways plus major and minor state highways that go through sparsely populated areas. When I had T-Mobile I knew that I'd lose coverage on those roads because their maps showed no coverage. I do understand that for many people they never leave urban and suburban areas and hence are okay with a lack of rural coverage.

  10. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobdevnul View Post
    Exactly, the approval of the Sprint sale to T-Mo is in no way certain. The key hurdle is scrutiny by the DOJ Antitrust Division. They have said next to nothing that I have noticed so far. IIRC, review and a decision by DOJ is not due until sometime next year.

    It is a big hurdle to jump to remove one of four horizontal competitors from the national market. It would not surprise me at all if the DOJ sues to block the sale.

    I expect the FCC to bless the union. Antitrust is not their purview.

    Personally, I am ambivalent about it.
    I can't imagine it not going through. If for no other reason that the alternative is for Sprint to either shut down or be sold at a bargain price to someone like Google.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smsgator View Post
    I can't imagine it not going through. If for no other reason that the alternative is for Sprint to either shut down or be sold at a bargain price to someone like Google.
    Ya this is a tough one.. I see this being a lengthy process... what will give John and team more fire power.. is Verizon buying up all this spectrum participating in the upcoming spectrum auction and commitment to participate in next years mid band auction.. will make Verizon that much stronger


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by james4209 View Post
    My point exactly. Until it happens T-Mobile "intending" to do something is meaningless except to the fanboys. Although it does make for great marketing material.
    T-Mobile's in a tough spot when it comes to balancing their statements regarding the Sprint merger with their statements on their upgrade plans. On the one hand they want to give the impression to the federal government that without the Sprint merger they have no path to becoming a third top-tier carrier that can compete against AT&T and Verizon, which is probably true. On the other hand they want to give the impression to their customers that they are already moving forward with plans to expand their coverage and add 5G service so they can compete more effectively against AT&T and Verizon. T-Mobile really needs the mid-band spectrum that Sprint possesses but has not found a way to monetize.

    Does being a year or two late to 5G really matter all that much to T-Mobile? 5G phones won't be shipping in volume until 2020, and they have no presence in the IOT space and mobile broadband where 5G is already being deployed.
    Last edited by smsgator; 10-11-2018 at 01:02 PM.

  13. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by jet1000 View Post
    None of those apps also own a wireless network that can deliver video content straight to consumers. They all need the customer to use a separate internet connection to view their content.

    Layer 3 (and I'm not talking about the current cable company, but the future wireless version) will be able to deliver video content straight to the customer via T-mobile's wireless spectrum. That's the big difference between Layer 3 and the apps you listed.
    You are right that T-Mobile could offer that stand alone TV service. However, I would be very surprised if if T-Mobile offered a streaming TV service as a stand alone product without adding in full internet service. Most people want both home broadband and TV. T-Mobile will in my opinion try to bundle your Mobile, TV and WISP service as one complete package just like Comcast, Charter & AT&T does now plus Verizon is in a few metro areas. Once you got internet access you can stream YouTubeTV, Hulu, Sling, Amazon Prime, Netflix, Playstation Vue, Philo TV or Pluto TV.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shilohcane View Post
    You are right that T-Mobile could offer that stand alone TV service. However, I would be very surprised if if T-Mobile offered a streaming TV service as a stand alone product without adding in full internet service. Most people want both home broadband and TV. T-Mobile will in my opinion try to bundle your Mobile, TV and WISP service as one complete package just like Comcast, Charter & AT&T does now plus Verizon is in a few metro areas. Once you got internet access you can stream YouTubeTV, Hulu, Sling, Amazon Prime, Netflix, Playstation Vue, Philo TV or Pluto TV.
    At what point do all the content providers realize that they don't really need a carrier to be a middleman, and all they really need is the data pipe?

  15. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by smsgator View Post

    T-Mobile has not even fully built out a 2G, 3G, or 4G network yet
    T-Mobile has not announced any plans to expand 2G and 3G coverage. So yes, those networks are fully built out as far as they are concerned. In fact, in some areas they have eliminated the 3G coverage and moved the spectrum to LTE.

    but they are already talking about their plans for 5G.
    Of course.

    You can't blame Legere for being out there dissing Verizon. He needs to try to prevent his subscribers from moving to someone elses home 5G solution before he can roll out 5G in a year or two.
    He doesn't have to prevent anyone from going to Verizon as you falsely state. According to Verizon, "Initial availability will be limited to "certain neighborhoods" in the four launch cities."

    https://arstechnica.com/information-...-no-data-caps/

    Good luck being in the "certain neighborhood" that has it. Verizon won't have any relevant market share of any kind. T-Mobile's plan is to mainly target the customers from Comcast & Charter as they state here:

    "Specifically, T-Mobile’s chief operating officer Mike Sievert told the FCC that New T-Mobile “has confirmed that there is a large market for New T-Mobile’s in-home broadband offering at the anticipated pricing and service levels.” He said the company expects to offer in-home internet services to 52% of the zip codes across the county by 2024, covering 64% of Charter’s territory and 68% of Comcast’s territory. “New T-Mobile expects to utilize caching and other network optimization techniques to increase the number of households that can be served,” he said.

    Further, Sievert predicted New T-Mobile would gain 1.9 million in-home wireless broadband customers by 2021 and 9.5 million customers by 2024, making it the nation’s fourth largest in-home ISP by 2024."

    https://www.fiercewireless.com/5g/ne...-to-take-shape

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