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Thread: Why not Huawei

  1. #1
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    Why not Huawei

    Former top Canadian security officials warn Ottawa to sever links with China’s Huawei
    Globe and Mail, March 19 2018
    Robert Fife and Stephen Chase

    Three former directors of Canada’s key national security agencies are urging the federal government to heed the warnings of U.S. intelligence services and cut Canadian ties with Huawei, the giant Chinese smartphone and telecom equipment maker.

    Ward Elcock, John Adams and Richard Fadden are weighing in on the matter after the heads of the CIA, FBI, National Security Agency and the Defence Intelligence Agency recently told the U.S. Senate intelligence committee that Huawei poses a cybersecurity threat to American customers. U.S. spymasters say Huawei’s smartphones and networking equipment could be used to conduct undetected espionage, especially the next, advanced generation of 5G technology.

    Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale told The Globe and Mail in a statement on Friday that Huawei is being monitored and does not pose a risk to Canada’s cybersecurity.

    But Mr. Elcock, a former CSIS director, deputy minister of National Defence, and Security and Intelligence Deputy Clerk of the Privy Council, said he shares U.S. concerns about Huawei, which was founded by a former engineer in the People’s Liberation Army and has been accused of acting as an arm of Beijing.

    “I have a pretty good idea of how signal-intelligence agencies work and the rules under which they work and their various operations and … I would not want to see Huawei equipment being incorporated into a 5G network in Canada,” Mr. Elcock told The Globe. Signals intelligence is the monitoring and interception of predominantly foreign communications by national security agencies.

    Canada has been wary of Huawei’s operations for years, but the company’s presence here has been growing, and security experts say Ottawa has not been as aggressive as other Western countries, such as Britain, in testing Huawei’s equipment for security vulnerabilities.

    Bell Canada is conducting trial runs in rural communities to test the next generation of 5G technology. Last March, Huawei and the Ontario government announced they would focus on 5G technology at the Chinese company’s Canada Research Centre in Kanata, Ont. In December, Huawei included Carleton University in its 5G research.

    Mr. Adams, the former head of the Communications Security Establishment (CSE), said Huawei has long been a concern to Canadian and U.S. spy services. CSE is Canada’s secretive signals intelligence agency.

    “I would be very careful about getting engaged with Huawei,” he said in an interview. “It doesn’t surprise me that the Americans are concerned about Huawei and no doubt especially concerned about what they may be doing in 5G.”

    U.S. security officials say Huawei products and the new 5G technology provide China with the capacity to conduct remote spying and maliciously modify or steal information or even shut down systems.

    Fifth-generation, or 5G, mobile internet technology, which is not expected to be fully rolled out until 2020, promises to bring massively increased data speed and introduce wireless virtual and even remote surgery. It would make it possible to download a feature-like movie in a matter of seconds and is expected to lead to driverless smart cars and smart homes.

    Mr. Fadden, who was also a CSIS director and national security adviser to prime ministers Stephen Harper and Justin Trudeau, agreed that Huawei should not be a trusted partner in Canada’s telecommunications networks.

    “I think Huawei is operating in an area of strategic interest to both Canada and China and I think it is a strategic interest area where you do not want to make available to a large Chinese company, with ties to the Chinese government, access to Canadian infrastructure,” Mr. Fadden said in an interview.

    Mr. Goodale declined an interview request but his office provided a statement to The Globe, saying Ottawa is not ignoring Washington’s cybersecurity warnings about Huawei.

    “The Government of Canada is aware of the concerns and takes the security of its critical infrastructure very seriously,” the Public Safety Minister’s office said. “Canadians can be assured that the government works diligently to monitor for security threats and that there are measures in place to protect Canada’s systems.”

    Huawei Canada vice-president Scott Bradley said the world’s largest telecommunications manufacturer does not pose a threat to cybersecurity in Canada or the United States. The company has been operating in Canada since 2008 without any problems, he said.

    “All of Huawei Canada’s business and research operations are conducted in a manner that reflects the objectives of the government and operators on a number of measurements, including national security,” he said in a statement.

    Mr. Bradley said Canada is a world leader in 5G and that Huawei’s investment in this technological research supports 700 jobs and contributes to a “thriving, competitive telecommunications ecosystem” in the country.

    5G technology promises to offer consumers faster streaming content, but would also require a multitude of small cellphone base stations. This required expansion of infrastructure will mean lots of demand for telecom equipment from companies such as Sweden’s Ericsson, Finland’s Nokia or China’s Huawei.

    A spokesman for Bell Canada would not comment on whether there were security risks with Huawei products. On Friday, Bell provided a brief statement to The Globe: “Huawei is one of our long-standing network infrastructure and mobile device partners.”

    When he headed CSE between 2005 and 2012, Mr. Adams said his approach was to keep Huawei on the “peripheries where they could not hopefully do a helluva lot of damage.”

    Mr. Adams said Ottawa hasn’t been nearly as aggressive with Huawei as the United States because it had wanted to encourage competition against the three main telecoms. Huawei has had a competitive advantage, largely because it has allegedly stolen Western technology and has not had to price in R&D, he said.

    Huawei sells its smartphones in Canada – devices Mr. Elcock said he would never use – but it is not known whether its core switching equipment infrastructure is being used by Canadian telecoms firms.

    The Chinese telecom behemoth, which operates in 170 countries, is running parts of Britain’s broadband and mobile infrastructure, but the British government says it has mitigated the threat by checking over Huawei equipment at a cyberevaluation centre for possible back doors, faults and bugs that could be exploited for espionage purposes. The Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre was created as a compromise between security misgivings and the private sector’s desire for cheap technology.

    A Canadian industry source told The Globe that the CSE conducts similar tests of Huawei equipment, which the intelligence agency confirmed including verification of handsets for use in the Canadian market.

    “In short, yes. CSE provides methodologies, advice and guidance on conducting commercial product assessments,” CSE spokesperson Ryan Foreman said in statement. “This is done in partnership with commercial evaluation facilities and international partners. Furthermore, a limited in-house capability exists for the evaluation of commercial products where additional assurance is warranted.”

    Security and intelligence expert Wesley Wark, who teaches at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, said CSE does not have the same capabilities as the British Huawei evaluation centre.

    He argued that the federal and provincial governments should not buy any Huawei products, especially its 5G network.

    “Any embedding of Huawei products in digital and information-critical infrastructure, especially at the federal government level, should be a no-go area,” he said.

    During testimony to the U.S. Senate intelligence committee in mid-February, FBI Director Chris Wray said he was “deeply concerned about the risk of allowing any company or entity that is beholden to the foreign governments that don’t share our values to gain positions of power inside our telecommunications networks.”

    Huawei, founded by former Red Army officer Ren Zhenfei, has no public list of shareholders, but says it is privately owned and independent from the Chinese state.

    - Globe and Mail

    --
    China's Surveillance State Should Scare Everyone
    The Atlantic, Feb 2
    Last edited by pjw918; 03-19-2018 at 07:33 PM.

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    How Canadian money and research are helping China become a global telecom superpower
    Globe and Mail, May 26

    [in-depth feature on Huawei's co-opting of Canadian 5G research, in full @Globe (subscribers)]

    Canadian universities, governments and phone companies are helping Huawei Technologies develop cutting-edge, 5G mobile technology that could make the surging Chinese corporate giant a dominant force when the wireless communications industry makes its next great leap forward.

    A Globe and Mail investigation reveals Huawei has established a vast network of relationships with leading research-heavy universities in Canada to create a steady pipeline of intellectual property that the company is using to underpin its market position in 5G.

    In fact, the company has spent about a quarter of its $600-million research and development budget for 5G here – and almost nothing in the United States, where it is viewed as a security concern.

    That has critics in Canada alarmed on two fronts. Intellectual property experts say China stands to reap far greater economic rewards than Canada in 5G, despite the fact much of the breakthrough research is being done here. And national security experts are troubled that Canadian institutions are willingly advancing the economic and geopolitical interests of a firm regarded as a corporate arm of the Chinese state – and considered one of the world’s top cyberintelligence threats – even as Ottawa recently blocked the sale of Canadian construction giant Aecon Group Ltd. to a Chinese state-owned firm, citing national security concerns.

    “This is a China-based goal to take over telecom,” said Brian Shields, a U.S. security adviser who worked at now-defunct Nortel Networks and helped uncover alleged Chinese hacking of the Canadian company’s trade secrets that ended up in Huawei’s hands. “Our university systems should be providing the next technology that should be then turned into our own industries [in Canada]. Why should we be turning that technology over to some foreign country?”

    That’s not just a problem with Huawei, critics of its efforts here say, but part of a chronic condition in Canada, a country known more for its inventors than the entrepreneurs who made money turning scientific breakthroughs into wealth and prosperity.

    “Canada is creating the technology and will pay to use the technology we created. We’re missing out on that middle piece – the commercialization of innovation. That’s where the money is,” said Jim Hinton, a Waterloo, Ont., patent lawyer. “We need to retain at least some ownership of what we’re subsidizing so that we can grow technology companies that own IP behind the technology, with the resultant IP royalties being used to create tens of thousands of jobs. As it currently stands in the technology space, Canada is an employee and consumer state – we work for pennies to harvest the land, then pay our foreign masters dollars to eat what we had harvested.”

    Since arriving in Canada a decade ago, Huawei Technologies has committed about $50-million to 13 leading Canadian universities, including the University of Waterloo, the University of Toronto, McGill University and the University of British Columbia, to fund the development of the next generation of ultra-fast wireless technology, which Huawei has used as the basis for hundreds of patent filings. Its funding is expected to grow to about $18-million this year alone from about half that amount in 2015.

    Huawei has worked with almost a hundred professors in Canada (and hundreds of their graduate students), who have additionally obtained millions of dollars in government grants from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) for their Huawei-related research.
    ...
    For Canada’s telecom carriers, Huawei represents a new supplier and customer option, and they are offering the company’s new smartphone, the P20. And Canadian carriers have been able to work with the company’s cutting-edge technology: Some of Huawei’s first field tests with 5G technology took place last year in the Vancouver area in partnership with Telus Corp.
    ...

    Globe and Mail
    Last edited by pjw918; 06-19-2018 at 09:06 AM.
    A Canadian tale of wireless competition, and Another
    From unjust discrimination to undue preference - a CRTC timeline

  3. #3
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    U.S. lawmakers warn Canada about Chinese telecom giant Huawei
    Globe and Mail, June 18

    Senior lawmakers on U.S. intelligence committees are warning the Trudeau government that Chinese smartphone maker Huawei – which has turned Canada into a key research centre for next-generation mobile technology – is a national-security threat to a network of Canada’s allies.

    Republican Senator Tom Cotton and Democratic Senator Mark Warner told The Globe and Mail that the Chinese telecom giant is a grave cybersecurity risk and its smartphones and equipment should not be used by Canada and other Western allies.

    Of paramount concern is an all-out drive by the Chinese technology conglomerate to become a world leader in the next-wave 5G telecommunications technology, which is expected to bring near-broadband speeds to smartphones and enable such breakthrough technologies as driverless cars.

    A spokesperson for Mr. Cotton, who has tabled legislation to ban the U.S. government from dealing with Huawei, said he instructed the director of the National Security Agency, Lieutenant-General Paul Nakasone, to “engage with Canadians” and other members of the “Five Eyes” intelligence-sharing community “to educate them on the threat” and keep Huawei out of their 5G networks.

    Five Eyes is an intelligence-sharing network among Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Britain and the United States.

    Huawei is largely shut out of the U.S. market and Australia is currently considering blocking the Chinese national tech champion from supplying equipment to the construction of 5G telecommunications infrastructure – a move that would further frustrate the Shenzhen-based company’s ambition to be the world leader in this technology.

    In Canada, a Globe and Mail investigation last month revealed that universities, governments and phone companies are helping Huawei – now the largest telecommunications equipment manufacturer in the world – to develop the ultrafast wireless technology, which it is using for hundreds of patent filings. Canadian universities are a pipeline for intellectual property that bolsters the company’s 5G market position.

    Chiefs of six U.S. intelligence agencies and three former heads of Canada’s spy services recently said that Huawei is one of the world’s top cyberintelligence threats and its 5G technology could be used to conduct remote spying and maliciously modify or steal information or even shut down systems.

    “Certainly this threat demonstrates the need for a concerted, co-ordinated response among allies,” Mr. Warner said in a statement to The Globe. “The significant U.S. presence – government, corporate and citizen – in Canada, and the vulnerabilities telecom equipment and infrastructure can present, should underscore that concern, as does China’s use of coercion, forced co-operation and co-option to acquire sensitive technologies.”

    Mr. Nakasone, who heads the U.S. signals intelligence agency, told the Senate intelligence committee that he would not use Huawei products because the company answers to the ruling Communist Party. Article 7 of China’s 2017 National Intelligence Law says that Chinese companies must “support, co-operate with and collaborate in national intelligence work, and guard the secrecy of national intelligence work they are aware of.”

    Two senior members of the intelligence committee in the House of Representatives – ranking Democrat Adam Schiff and Republican Mike Conaway – said national-security concerns should raise alarm bells in any country where Huawei products are sold and could compromise Five Eyes intelligence.

    Five Eyes is an intelligence-sharing network among Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Britain and the United States.

    Despite these concerns, all major Canadian telecom carriers are now heavily promoting Huawei’s latest smartphone, and Canadian universities have defended the work they do with Huawei, saying they haven’t been told by Canada’s national-security agencies to avoid producing R&D for the Chinese behemoth.

    Michael Wessel, a commissioner on the U.S.-China Economic Security Commission, a watchdog that reports to Congress, said Huawei has “dramatically expanded” its relationships with universities around the world, hoping to harvest the best research.

    “Huawei’s involvement with Canadian universities raises serious questions as well in light of the strong relationship between U.S. and Canadian technology and telecommunications firms, the integrated nature of our technology infrastructure and the cutting-edge research being done in Canada,” Mr. Wessel said.

    “Canada, through its recent rejection of the purchase of Aecon by a Chinese state-owned entry, has shown an increasing sensitivity to Chinese security threats and should act, as the U.S. should, to have their universities quickly sever their ties to Huawei.”

    Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale did not respond to a request for comment and instead referred The Globe to the Communications Security Establishment, which collects foreign security intelligence and seeks to protect Ottawa’s information systems from cyberattacks.

    “While we are unable to comment on specific companies, products or service providers, Canadians can be assured that the Government of Canada is working to make sure the strongest protections are in place to safeguard the systems Canadians rely on,” spokesman Evan Koronewski said.
    ...
    Since arriving in Canada a decade ago, Huawei has committed about $50-million to 10 leading Canadian universities to fund 5G technology, which it used as the basis for hundreds of patent filings.
    ...

    Globe and Mail

    --
    ZTE shares tank after U.S. Senate puts Trump reprieve in doubt
    Reuters June 19

    China's Huawei goes on offensive as exclusion from Australia 5G deal looms
    Reuters, June 17
    .
    Last edited by pjw918; 06-19-2018 at 01:26 PM. Reason: ZTE; Australia

  4. #4
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    On 5G development Telus works with Huawei, Rogers with Ericsson, Shaw/Freedom with Nokia.
    Since the first successful Canadian 5G trial with Nokia in 2016, Bell partnered with Huawei.

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    Ottawa sees Chinese-owned Huawei as major security threat, senior officials say
    Globe and Mail, Jul 30 2018
    Robert Fife

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is increasingly alarmed about the national security threat from Chinese high-tech giant Huawei and is working with key Canadian allies to limit its ambition to become a world leader in next-generation 5G wireless technology, senior government officials say.
    ...
    The Globe and Mail has also learned that Huawei and its ties to the Chinese government dominated secret intelligence talks on the sidelines of the Commonwealth summit in London on April 19-20.

    A senior federal official said Mr. Trudeau and leaders of Britain, Australia and New Zealand had a long discussion on the cybersecurity risk from Huawei’s efforts to build new ultra-fast mobile networks. The four countries are part of the Five Eyes intelligence network, which along with the United States comprise an alliance that allows police, prosecutors and spies to exchange information to prevent espionage and terrorism.

    The Canadian official said Mr. Trudeau, British Prime Minister Theresa May, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern agreed in London that their countries cannot become dependent upon Huawei’s 5G technology because they view the Shenzen-based company as beholden to the Chinese state. Under Communist Party law, Chinese companies must work for their intelligence agencies if requested.
    ...
    Huawei is excluded from selling its equipment to the Canadian government and Canadian telecoms do not allow Huawei products in its core infrastructure. Canada – like Britain – also has a special laboratory where Huawei products can be tested if necessary to ensure they don’t contain back doors or other mechanisms for secretly monitoring information.
    ...
    Earlier this month, a British government report warned technical and supply-chain issues with equipment made by Huawei have exposed Britain’s telecom networks to new security risks. The report was released July 19 after sources told Reuters that senior British security officials say they can now give only limited assurances that Huawei’s operations pose no threat to that country’s national security.

    Former Research in Motion Ltd. (now known as BlackBerry Ltd.) co-CEO Jim Balsillie said Canada, Britain, Australia and New Zealand are right to probe China’s intentions, given Beijing’s record of building a surveillance state with state-of-the-art equipment.
    ...
    The Canadian government official said one problem facing the Five Eyes alliance is that North America has few homegrown players poised to play a role in global 5G development and the U.S. is not a major presence. Mobile infrastructure suppliers firms include Huawei, Sweden’s Ericsson and Nokia of Finland. Other participants in 5G technology include China’s ZTE, and the United States' Qualcomm, Cisco and Juniper.

    Despite Five Eyes cybersecurity concerns, all major Canadian telecom carriers are now heavily promoting Huawei’s latest smartphone, and, as The Globe reported in May, the firm has established a vast network of relationships with leading research-heavy universities in Canada to create a steady pipeline of intellectual property that the company is using to underpin its market position in 5G technology.
    ...

    Story in full at the Globe
    Subscribe

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    T-Mobile and Nokia ink $3.5 billion, multi-year 5G network agreement
    July 30
    Last edited by pjw918; 07-30-2018 at 07:13 PM.

  6. #6
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    To be fair, all vendors have major vulnerabilities from time to time. Here's a recent one from Cisco:
    https://tools.cisco.com/security/cen...nexus9k-sshkey
    Want to learn more about how LTE works?
    https://productioncommunity.publicmo...ls/td-p/130581

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