Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 31 to 43 of 43

Thread: Let's fix T-Mobile One, my suggestion for a reasonable net neutral alternative

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    1,062
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by NotABiot View Post
    T-Mobile's customer-hostile schemes like "Binge On" are breaking it.
    At least with the SimpleChoice plans you could disable Binge On if you wanted to with no penalty or charge to do so. With the new UnlimitedOne, you have to pay to disable it. It's a toll fee for content.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    420
    Feedback Score
    0
    I did disable Binge On. I found it offensive to even suggest I'd watch movies. I would rather read Wikipedia. I'm not watching any video of any damn kind. I don't do music in the background. So if html is breaking Binge On or http or http(s) ---- or .ORG, .GOV. EDU

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    14,802
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by NotABiot View Post
    Net neutrality is a solution to a huge problem looming of carriers charging you more
    It's just looming in the minds of the paranoid Net Neutrality fanatics. There's no evidence of any imminent problem whatsoever.

    That is exactly what T-Mobile is now doing with its illegal Binge-On scam.
    Except it's not illegal and has never been ruled illegal by any federal authority. Just illegal in your mind, but you apparently didn't write nor enforce the law.

    It is up to the customers to choose what to do with the data they pay for, not the carrier. The customer has already paid for it. Net Neutrality does not run up any costs at all.
    Of course it runs up the cost. You have long been an advocate of removing Binge On and forcing every T-Mobile customer to pay for every GB they use much like AT&T and Verizon does. You advocate higher prices for the consumer and more profits for the corporations.

    "Everyone claims T-Mobiles [illegal censorship scam] violated net neutral but in fact the FCC Chairman Wheeler claimed Binge On was innovated and didn't violate net neutral. "

    He lied: as T-Mobile is breaking existing law.
    That's a big joke. He set the rules, not the EFF, not some professor stuck at some college. He knows what the rules covered and T-Mobile has never even been warned about Binge On. So there's absolutely know evidence that T-Mobile is breaking some law as you falsely claim.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    14,802
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by cellphone_guru View Post
    With the new UnlimitedOne, you have to pay to disable it. It's a toll fee for content.
    That's right, T-Mobile is giving their customers a choice to just pay for the content that they want or need. If you don't need HD Video, don't pay. You have made your position quite clear that you want EVERY customer to pay for HD Video.

    Net Neutrality supporters are trying to force their values and beliefs onto the world at large forcing them to pay higher data rates.

    The consumer must stand up against these NN supporters who are out to line the pockets of big corporations with higher prices for data.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,484
    Device(s)
    S9
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by NotABiot View Post
    Net neutrality is a solution to a huge problem looming of carriers charging you more because they don't the content or provider. That is exactly what T-Mobile is now doing with its illegal Binge-On scam.

    It is up to the customers to choose what to do with the data they pay for, not the carrier. The customer has already paid for it. Net Neutrality does not run up any costs at all.

    "T-Mobile new service plan is cheaper and better for consumer"

    The opposite is true. Under Binge-On, T-Mobile is fining customers for viewing data from most video providers.

    "Everyone claims T-Mobiles [illegal censorship scam] violated net neutral but in fact the FCC Chairman Wheeler claimed Binge On was innovated and didn't violate net neutral. "

    He lied: as T-Mobile is breaking existing law.

    "The only issue is the Verizon, AT&T and Sprint fans are upset that their over rated and over priced networks don't have a plan like T-Mobile One."

    Verizon and AT&T have hugely better networks that T-Mobile. Customers choose them 4 to 1 over T-Mobile. You get what you pay for, and the vast majority choose to pay more for networks that actually provide a signal where they live, work, and play.
    Just totally 100% ridiculous. No one has notices anything different since Net Neutrality started and no one will notice after it is removed as law. Net Neutrality is a solution for something that has never been a problem. Net Neutrality is Anti-Consumer that drives up prices and make the internet less efficient. Anyone that thinks the goverment law makers knows how to run the internet more efficient than a ISP is dreaming. Net Neutrality is just a new form of government tax to ISP if they can find some way to extort money from the ISP.

    BTW, AT&T is vastly inferior to T-Mobile where I live and Rootmetrics proves it. Also, your 4-to-1 math sucks since AT&T doesn't even have twice as many customers at T-Mobile and Verizon is still just over 2 to 1 compared to T-Mobile.
    Last edited by shilohcane; 08-25-2016 at 11:39 AM.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,484
    Device(s)
    S9
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by jet1000 View Post
    That's right, T-Mobile is giving their customers a choice to just pay for the content that they want or need. If you don't need HD Video, don't pay. You have made your position quite clear that you want EVERY customer to pay for HD Video.

    Net Neutrality supporters are trying to force their values and beliefs onto the world at large forcing them to pay higher data rates.

    The consumer must stand up against these NN supporters who are out to line the pockets of big corporations with higher prices for data.
    Agreed I don't need HD video on my 5" phone or 9" tablet. I have home wireline broadband internet from Comcast for my HD TV. Net Neturality fans are just trying to have cell phone customers to subsidizing their home internet for their HDTV.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,674
    Device(s)
    iPhone
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile USA
    Feedback Score
    0
    lets fix? is not broken!

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    681
    Feedback Score
    0
    Since no one is forced onto the plan, and it is simply an option for new customers (currernt can switch if they want) doesn't this make T-Mobile One not a violation of net neutrality/ open internet? Also, weren't the rules meant to prevent specific content from being excluded (so like Netflix only getting a fast lane) not a type of data (video in the fast lane). Also, what they are doing is putting video into a slow lane, and charging you to unlock it into a fast lane.

    The plan doesn't need fixing from a net neutrality / open internet area. I have no doubt that T-Mobile had its legal department go over this after the whole binge on thing. And at the end, it turned out binge on wasn't a violation.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    14,802
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Shakezula84 View Post
    Since no one is forced onto the plan, and it is simply an option for new customers (currernt can switch if they want) doesn't this make T-Mobile One not a violation of net neutrality/ open internet?
    Yes.

    Also, weren't the rules meant to prevent specific content from being excluded (so like Netflix only getting a fast lane) not a type of data (video in the fast lane).
    Again correct. This is actually more fair than Binge On as with Binge On, video content providers had to qualify to be added to the list. Now they are treating all video the same. Much more fair. But apparently the only way Neutrality supporters can be satisfied is when every customer pays for every GB.

    I have no doubt that T-Mobile had its legal department go over this after the whole binge on thing. And at the end, it turned out binge on wasn't a violation.
    Of course. They also likely called their counterparts at the FCC and ran a draft of this plan by them before implementing it. People who want to file FCC complaints don't seem to realize that the FCC likely already extended a tacit consent to T-Mobile One. Large corporations run such things by regulatory agencies all the time. It's not like the FCC was surprised to see this when Legere announced it.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Raleigh
    Posts
    224
    Carrier(s)
    t-mobile, at&t, FI
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by shakrai View Post
    Right, but CenturyLink has control over their over-subscription ratio. They could fix that issue if they were so inclined. A wireless carrier has no control over where its users choose to try and access the network. A low CQI will decrease speeds even if the tower is completely idle and there's precious little the carrier can do about it.

    It's also not really to the carrier's benefit to artificially slow you down. Each active data connection consumes a non-zero amount of resources in the form of overhead, which remains constant regardless of bitrate. With "bursty" traffic (i.e., web page loads, Facebook, small to medium downloads, etc.) it's better to give the subscriber as much speed as possible, so they get off the air faster. It's also to the subscribers benefit; an idle radio can go into sleep mode, with significant power savings that translate into longer battery life.
    Streaming is leading cause of data consumption today, even by tmobile's own admission. So a user can continue streaming at 8 mbps forever. If their speed was limited to 1 mbps then that is what they will use and the streaming service will adjust itself to available speed.

    That argument didn't hold true even before streaming; it is only true if all the bandwidth is constantly being used in a predetermined fashion. If most users download files that are at most a few k large (most web browsing follows this routine) then the actual download time doesn't change that much with speed but lower speeds (smaller channel size or frequency spectrum slice) means more data channels and more simultaneous connections.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    2,527
    Device(s)
    Sonim XP8, iPhone XS, Pixel 3 XL
    Carrier(s)
    SouthernLINC, T-Mobile, Verizon
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by shilohcane View Post
    BTW, AT&T is vastly inferior to T-Mobile where I live and Rootmetrics proves it..
    Yea but they are behind AT&T on a national scale where the rest of the country is.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,484
    Device(s)
    S9
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    This authors makes two great points:

    1. "The basic net neut proviso is that internet service providers cannot treat data differently based on type. However, there is a loophole, where the FCC rules can make allowances for reasonable network management. It’s instructive that in the year since Binge On was introduced, the FCC has not said it has any problems with the plan."

    2. "The One Plan is unlimited, with video limited to 480p. Perhaps they just should have positioned it as $70 for Unlimited with video at 480p, and $95 for Unlimited with HD Video. How is that any different than Comcast charging $30 for 25 MB ‘Performance’ broadband, and $83 for ‘Blast’ 150 MB? A family that wants to use Ultra HD on Netflix probably has to pay for a premium broadband plan, in the same way that a TMO subscriber must pay extra for HD streaming? Would the net neut folks argue that streaming in Ultra HD be included in unlimited wireless plans, too? (not that UHD looks much better on a small screen device)."

    T-Mobile One – A new reality, not net neutrality

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    d.c.
    Posts
    1,955
    Device(s)
    pixel xl
    Carrier(s)
    google fi
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by fflip8 View Post
    I've always wanted wireless to be marketed like cable, at least when cable had no data caps... Otherwise, I don't understand the speed boost. What's the point of it? Is it to keep the packets flowing so it doesn't cause congestion for small tasks or for another purpose? However this would reduce T-Mobile's revenue because most people would choose the low speed tier because they save so much money. To protect revenue, if T-Mobile were to introduce this type of plan, the $60 plan would have to be capped at 128kbps tethering, to keep the low end plan bare minimum so only low data users use it, not drag midrange users into the low end pricing.

    watch, slowly, but surely -

    **Google Fiber may go wireless for LA and Chicago launches**

    **Google Fiber wants to start testing wireless internet to homes in over a dozen U.S. cities**

    **google's webpass buy points the way to a speedier internet for everyone **


    it will come a time when google will roll it's wireless fiber options with FI, & use it, instead of tmobile, sprint, & ussc -


    "..There are other reports though that say Google is going to pay a wholesale rate of just $2 per-gigabyte of data. *Sprint likely has a clause in its agreement allowing a renegotiation of the contract if Google ends up taking on a large number of subscribers should the search giant opt to try and low-ball the market with ultra-cheap price plans*..."

    from - Google inks deal to be Sprint MVNO

    which I believe, is why g Fi's prices aren't lower than what they are now, remove that dependency I believe Fi could offer unlimited, un-molested, mobile services along with fiber to the homes..


    it can't happen soon enough for me..

    they'd scrape the whole user base from the carrier's trickery & gimics..

    users will port in droves, they'd have to call the natl guard to stem the traffic..
    Last edited by j'vai; 08-26-2016 at 02:24 PM.
    >:-,

    “There's no benchmark for how life's "supposed" to happen. There is no ideal world for you to wait around for. The world is always just what it is now, it's up to you how you respond to it.”
    ― Isaac Marion, Warm Bodies

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Similar Threads

  1. Will T-mobile change my number for free?
    By samc in forum T-Mobile
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 06-04-2007, 09:11 PM
  2. Replies: 25
    Last Post: 06-10-2004, 09:47 PM
  3. Can't receive email to my phone for some reason...
    By moofur in forum Rogers/Fido/Chat-r
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-26-2004, 01:22 AM
  4. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-09-2003, 02:57 AM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-10-2003, 10:13 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks