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Thread: Opening a new cricket store . What marketing scheme worked for you guys

  1. #46
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    The problem with putting your store in higher income area is that higher income areas tend to have more highly educated consumers. On first glance Cricket often seems like a great deal, until you start looking at the fine print. Not sure what you mean about the fine print. We as transplant as water. Nothing we hide like the big providers

    The Cricket International Extra is pretty much a necessity for international calling because of so many people "cutting the cord." It's understandable that it costs more because so many countries have "Caller Pays" for mobile. It's a pretty bad deal unless you're making a lot of international calls. Other MVNOs offer low cost pay-as-you-go international calling. they have calling cards a lot cheaper, that demographic do need to call many international

    Your real target customers from postpaid carriers are probably T-Mobile and Sprint customers since they are suffering with such a poor domestic network so AT&T, even without roaming, is better than T-Mobile. Sprint roams onto Verizon so even though Sprint's native network sucks, they work around that. Trying to get Verizon and AT&T customers to switch to Cricket would be hard. Virgin, Boost, and other T-Mobile and Sprint MVNOs are also good targets. Trying to switch att and verizon is easier, you need to look at most people bills

    The $25 activation fee matters because anyone thinking of changing carriers, who is doing online research will quickly find that they can activate for free online. The fact that the postpaid carriers charge a $30-36 fee is immaterial but you keep harping on it. Offering to waive the fee once they come into the store isn't going to work because they don't know that the fee will be waived in advance so they won't come to the store in the first place. Any advertising you do should include something like "bring in this flyer for free activation." As I said, fee will not be a problem, of course if they bring a flyer it will be waived and if they come to my store, I am not letting them walk out due to a $25 fee. It never happened before, it will not happen in the future

    The five lines for $100 is the best marketing tactic for Cricket. For customers that don't care about tethering, roaming, un-throttled data, or international calling, that is very appealing. get real, not many people tether unless they are on the car all day. Most places have wifi. we can even put a sim on a tab and you can actually use the talk and text unlike verizon, they only offer data on tablet

    From what I can see on the Cricket web site, hot spot capability is $10 per line and only works on $50 and up plans. That sucks. Four lines with tethering would be $50+40+30+20+4*$10=$180 for four lines with hotspot and 5GB of throttled LTE data. agian, get real. No body uses hotspot on four phone line.

    On AT&T I would pay $85 + 4*$15=$145 plus about $25 in taxes and fees, or $170 for 15 GB shared. For a lot of families I think 15GB shared is better than 5GB per person because data usage varies greatly by users. Hence, on Cricket, you're paying more money and getting poorer coverage and slower data speeds, but you do get unlimited low speed data if you use up your LTE data. International roaming doesn't matter much too lower income consumers but it does matter to higher income consumers. Ether way 20gb with unlimited slower data after that is better than 15gb. Specially since you just answered your own question. Not everyone going to use 5gb nor use hotspot, some of the line they can have 40 plam. Yes go to Canada and mexico free roaming

    Don't go into this thinking that consumers don't understand the compromises that they have to make on Cricket. Be upfront about the compromises and explain the workarounds.

    1. International calling. Offer to set up Google Voice on their phones and explain how to use it for low cost international calling. they wont use that feature

    2. International roaming. Explain to them about prepaid SIM cards, both country-specific and multi-country, and explain about phone unlocking. Give them a list of good prepaid international SIM card vendors.thats why I prefer they bring in their own choice of unlocked phone.

    3. Tethering. This is dicey. There are ways to do tethering without the carrier knowing you're doing it but it requires root access and some knowledge of how to edit files. This is probably not something you're going to want to explain to people because it would reduce sales of the $50 plan and the $10 tethering fee. Ether way I will win the sale. tether or not

    4. U.S. Roaming. Advise customers to keep a Page Plus phone active at $2.50 per month for when they go into areas with no native AT&T coverage. Not many people will have to roam, only like two island is roaming for att

    If someone is educated and I explain the way cricket works, they have to have some kind of very accurate valid reason not to switch.
    I spoke to many att and verizon consumer. Nobody happy with their bill. Why do think they trying so hard to reduce their plans, even then they cant keep up.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcdeadbeat View Post
    Actually I am a serial entrepreneur, a VC, and a published author. I own several businesses and even a chicken farm that sells chickens to young professionals (urban farmers). The customers that buy my $2000 chickens are the same ones that live in Crofton or Bowie. The very customers you are trying to attract to your business. They are practical young professionals in that area that make six figures and want to live country but still have access to D.C. and Baltimore for their day jobs to fund their new found interests in urban farming. They are practical, sometimes spending very little to conserve money, while still capable of buying high-ticket items (a $5000 zero turn lawn mower or a rare $2000 chicken from Indonesia). But the one thing this market will not tolerate is lack of coverage or access to technology.

    So yes, I do now business AND marketing. It becomes helpful to have those traits when you are venture capitalist.

    However, I strictly deny funding to any company that uses race as part of its marketing program. Making a decision or taking action based upon the color of one's skin is the very definition of racism.

    The only color that you should be interested in is GREEN.

    But then again, don't listen to me as my advice as a serial entrepreneur is to avoid all advice your find online.

    You're trying too hard to impress people. $2,000 chickens and venture capitalist? .. I don't think it's working.

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by smsgator View Post
    Someone making $100K+ probably has enough education to know not to purchase accessories at Radio Shack.
    Ok. Well my two years experience at Sprint and T-Mobile also said that rich people don't buy accessories from stores either. They buy from Amazon or ebay.

  4. #49
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    To be honest, I think asking for business advice in an online forum shows some pretty fundamental things about the person asking. Best of luck to the OP and his new venture.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HansCT View Post
    To be honest, I think asking for business advice in an online forum shows some pretty fundamental things about the person asking. Best of luck to the OP and his new venture.
    To be Honest, that statement is not related to the post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shakezula84 View Post
    Ok. Well my two years experience at Sprint and T-Mobile also said that rich people don't buy accessories from stores either. They buy from Amazon or ebay.
    THose stores charges a arm and a leg for cases. I usually sell them anywhere between 5-15. Sometime even free.

    And if I do the calculation. Even though I try to save as much as possible. it goes close to that 100k range very easily if not careful. So making that much is not enough. specially with a family, few cars, five different kind of insurance and tons of expense.

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by soumikcha View Post
    The problem with putting your store in higher income area is that higher income areas tend to have more highly educated consumers. On first glance Cricket often seems like a great deal, until you start looking at the fine print. Not sure what you mean about the fine print. We as transplant as water. Nothing we hide like the big providers

    The Cricket International Extra is pretty much a necessity for international calling because of so many people "cutting the cord." It's understandable that it costs more because so many countries have "Caller Pays" for mobile. It's a pretty bad deal unless you're making a lot of international calls. Other MVNOs offer low cost pay-as-you-go international calling. they have calling cards a lot cheaper, that demographic do need to call many international

    Your real target customers from postpaid carriers are probably T-Mobile and Sprint customers since they are suffering with such a poor domestic network so AT&T, even without roaming, is better than T-Mobile. Sprint roams onto Verizon so even though Sprint's native network sucks, they work around that. Trying to get Verizon and AT&T customers to switch to Cricket would be hard. Virgin, Boost, and other T-Mobile and Sprint MVNOs are also good targets. Trying to switch att and verizon is easier, you need to look at most people bills

    The $25 activation fee matters because anyone thinking of changing carriers, who is doing online research will quickly find that they can activate for free online. The fact that the postpaid carriers charge a $30-36 fee is immaterial but you keep harping on it. Offering to waive the fee once they come into the store isn't going to work because they don't know that the fee will be waived in advance so they won't come to the store in the first place. Any advertising you do should include something like "bring in this flyer for free activation." As I said, fee will not be a problem, of course if they bring a flyer it will be waived and if they come to my store, I am not letting them walk out due to a $25 fee. It never happened before, it will not happen in the future

    The five lines for $100 is the best marketing tactic for Cricket. For customers that don't care about tethering, roaming, un-throttled data, or international calling, that is very appealing. get real, not many people tether unless they are on the car all day. Most places have wifi. we can even put a sim on a tab and you can actually use the talk and text unlike verizon, they only offer data on tablet

    From what I can see on the Cricket web site, hot spot capability is $10 per line and only works on $50 and up plans. That sucks. Four lines with tethering would be $50+40+30+20+4*$10=$180 for four lines with hotspot and 5GB of throttled LTE data. agian, get real. No body uses hotspot on four phone line.

    On AT&T I would pay $85 + 4*$15=$145 plus about $25 in taxes and fees, or $170 for 15 GB shared. For a lot of families I think 15GB shared is better than 5GB per person because data usage varies greatly by users. Hence, on Cricket, you're paying more money and getting poorer coverage and slower data speeds, but you do get unlimited low speed data if you use up your LTE data. International roaming doesn't matter much too lower income consumers but it does matter to higher income consumers. Ether way 20gb with unlimited slower data after that is better than 15gb. Specially since you just answered your own question. Not everyone going to use 5gb nor use hotspot, some of the line they can have 40 plam. Yes go to Canada and mexico free roaming

    Don't go into this thinking that consumers don't understand the compromises that they have to make on Cricket. Be upfront about the compromises and explain the workarounds.

    1. International calling. Offer to set up Google Voice on their phones and explain how to use it for low cost international calling. they wont use that feature

    2. International roaming. Explain to them about prepaid SIM cards, both country-specific and multi-country, and explain about phone unlocking. Give them a list of good prepaid international SIM card vendors.thats why I prefer they bring in their own choice of unlocked phone.

    3. Tethering. This is dicey. There are ways to do tethering without the carrier knowing you're doing it but it requires root access and some knowledge of how to edit files. This is probably not something you're going to want to explain to people because it would reduce sales of the $50 plan and the $10 tethering fee. Ether way I will win the sale. tether or not

    4. U.S. Roaming. Advise customers to keep a Page Plus phone active at $2.50 per month for when they go into areas with no native AT&T coverage. Not many people will have to roam, only like two island is roaming for att

    If someone is educated and I explain the way cricket works, they have to have some kind of very accurate valid reason not to switch.
    I spoke to many att and verizon consumer. Nobody happy with their bill. Why do think they trying so hard to reduce their plans, even then they cant keep up.
    The problem is that you're trying to convince yourself of things that simply are not true.

    1. Occasional tethering is extremely common for people with Wi-Fi only tablets, and most tablets sold are Wi-Fi only. Most people don't tether all that often, but they want the capability to tether.

    2. The fact that you are willing to waive the activation fee if requested is nice, but the problem is that most people compare wireless providers on the Internet then once they decide who to use they either do it online or go to a store. With Cricket, when I was looking into it, the first thing I saw was that it would cost me $100 at a store and $0 online. Eventually I decided I could not live with Cricket's drawbacks, and didn't go to them, but I was very close to signing up online. One favor that Cricket does for their stores is that they make signing up multiple lines online a real hassle.

    3. It is true that the workaround for Cricket's international calling issue is to use a calling card, preferably a virtual calling card that doesn't require PINs. That's something that needs to be explained to customers concerned about international calling. You don't just do +1 international calling.

    4. There are still a great many areas of the U.S., sometimes almost entire states, where there is no native AT&T coverage. Not sure what you're talking about when you say "only like two island is roaming for att." Just look at the maps. I think I counted areas in 22 states where there is some off-AT&T roaming on AT&T postpaid, sometimes small areas like in California, sometimes large areas like in Nebraska, Nevada, and Wyoming.

    5. The last thing you want to do is to try to explain to an educated consumer the way Cricket works. If you explain the tethering cost, the fact that to even pay for tethering you have to be on a $50 plan, the loss of coverage compared to AT&T and Verizon and Sprint postpaid, the lack of international roaming, the throttling, the ping times, and the issues with international calling, you'll scare away the higher-income, more educated consumers. Cricket is explicitly designed for less-educated, lower-income consumers that are willing to make significant compromises in exchange for lower cost. Look at where Cricket stores are placed, always in lower-income areas. Convincing educated consumers with higher incomes to make those compromises, especially the coverage compromise is very difficult.

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shakezula84 View Post
    Ok. Well my two years experience at Sprint and T-Mobile also said that rich people don't buy accessories from stores either. They buy from Amazon or ebay.
    Exactly. Or Monoprice. Or at a flea market. At least for cases, extra chargers, and cables. All very high margin sales.

    When Radio Shack went under I was seeing comments in various forums like "darn that's too bad, I used to go there when I needed something (cable, battery, connector, etc.) right away and could not wait to have it shipped to me from Amazon, eBay, etc." Which is why Radio Shack went under--too many people became too knowledgeable about where to buy items with huge mark-ups, and Radio Shack became a last resort.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by smsgator View Post
    Someone making $100K+ probably has enough education to know not to purchase accessories at Radio Shack.
    Why on earth would you think that? What does "enough" education have to do with Radio Shack? Some of the most educated people are some of the most naive and void of common sense, I went to school with a whole bunch of them!

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by smsgator View Post
    The problem is that you're trying to convince yourself of things that simply are not true.

    1. Occasional tethering is extremely common for people with Wi-Fi only tablets, and most tablets sold are Wi-Fi only. Most people don't tether all that often, but they want the capability to tether.

    2. The fact that you are willing to waive the activation fee if requested is nice, but the problem is that most people compare wireless providers on the Internet then once they decide who to use they either do it online or go to a store. With Cricket, when I was looking into it, the first thing I saw was that it would cost me $100 at a store and $0 online. Eventually I decided I could not live with Cricket's drawbacks, and didn't go to them, but I was very close to signing up online. One favor that Cricket does for their stores is that they make signing up multiple lines online a real hassle.

    3. It is true that the workaround for Cricket's international calling issue is to use a calling card, preferably a virtual calling card that doesn't require PINs. That's something that needs to be explained to customers concerned about international calling. You don't just do +1 international calling.

    4. There are still a great many areas of the U.S., sometimes almost entire states, where there is no native AT&T coverage. Not sure what you're talking about when you say "only like two island is roaming for att." Just look at the maps. I think I counted areas in 22 states where there is some off-AT&T roaming on AT&T postpaid, sometimes small areas like in California, sometimes large areas like in Nebraska, Nevada, and Wyoming.

    5. The last thing you want to do is to try to explain to an educated consumer the way Cricket works. If you explain the tethering cost, the fact that to even pay for tethering you have to be on a $50 plan, the loss of coverage compared to AT&T and Verizon and Sprint postpaid, the lack of international roaming, the throttling, the ping times, and the issues with international calling, you'll scare away the higher-income, more educated consumers. Cricket is explicitly designed for less-educated, lower-income consumers that are willing to make significant compromises in exchange for lower cost. Look at where Cricket stores are placed, always in lower-income areas. Convincing educated consumers with higher incomes to make those compromises, especially the coverage compromise is very difficult.
    1. Tethering is not all important for most people, even if is. The price is very reasonable.
    2. If you are adding four lines. It would have been only $25 activation fee and most dealer would waive it.
    3. Most peoplw in that area do not do much international or they use boss revolution.
    4. Three states with little coverage and nobody visit those area. And the rest is very little. And those will be fixed very soon.
    5. False........ False...... Cricket is a whole different game since att purchased them. I'm tired of talking to people who doesn't have any background in the field. Lol. none of those is a issue.

  11. #56
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    FYI everybody $100k yearly for a family of four Is not much.
    And is their a dealer forum. Can't take this comments no more. Lol

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by soumikcha View Post
    1. Tethering is not all important for most people, even if is. The price is very reasonable.
    2. If you are adding four lines. It would have been only $25 activation fee and most dealer would waive it.
    3. Most peoplw in that area do not do much international or they use boss revolution.
    4. Three states with little coverage and nobody visit those area. And the rest is very little. And those will be fixed very soon.
    5. False........ False...... Cricket is a whole different game since att purchased them. I'm tired of talking to people who doesn't have any background in the field. Lol. none of those is a issue.
    Have to agree with you about #5. smsgator is obsessed with the necessity of roaming -- and probably for good reason (i.e., because he wants/needs it for himself and his family). However, one thing has become clear to me from my time on HoFo -- different people want/need different amenities and services and the wide variety of different carriers caters to that wide range of wants/needs.

    Frankly, it is pretty insulting to claim that prepaid service is targeted to less-educated and lower income customers. This may have been true a generation ago, but many higher-educated or higher-income customers are choosing prepaid more than ever before exactly because they are well-informed, do their research, and are responsible with their money. That's not to say that anyone who chooses postpaid service (or a reseller that provides roaming coverage) is mine of those things -- different people have different wants/needs.

  13. #58
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    A lot of people - that's the term de rigueur in this thread, lol.

    100k jobs involve a lot of stress. These people pick their battles. And researching activation fees & accessories costs is not one of them.

    For the most part this business situation as outlined will succeed or fail on one issue. That is how many people walk in the door every month & the close rate.
    If my actions include deeds of philanthropy in charity and acts of loving kindness I am living in my Faith.

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    The way I am planning on getting customer is doing one on one conversation. If they like what I am saying. They will come to me and not go onlinwstore. And cricket covers 98% of population. Those area I just checked my rep who is really helpful, those are mountain and Indian Reservation. Most of those people never even heard of cricket. I am 99% sure they will reconsider once I tell them it's att service with half cost and twice the benefit.

  15. #60
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    Not to mention they now have reward program. So u get like $50 per line yearly for upgrade credit.

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