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Thread: Rogers just lost a client of 19 years

  1. #121
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    To me, I always thought to right a wrong, is the best approach to resolve a problem. However, there are reasons why this preferred method is not used. It could be cost, it could be a technical reason, it could be laziness, or it could be bad policy. But in lieu of this short fall, companies devise a band-aid alternative: "good will credit", or "good will gift". I once wrote a complaint letter to the HQ of a chain of a dollar store because I received a (what I perceived as anyway) rude retail clerk. I did not ask for compensation and just wanted them to know the facts. They sent me a $10. gift card and a letter.

    So there is a person here who said that those who tried to get freebies are tricking the system. For me, I never tried to trick the system, either it's wireless providers, or a retail chain. I much prefer they do a perfect job, and I never have to complain. But if they don't, and I do, I mostly hope that they could resolve the problem, and that they can also resolve their end of the problem so it won't happen to the next customer, thus, I help them to help me, which in return also helps them back. But this isn't a perfect world, and often, this doesn't work.

    And consumers know that; they know that they will never get a company to fix the billing problem (e.g. in my case, it wasn't fixed for 1 whole year), but they also know that, if they whine enough, they would at least get something out of that pain that is given to the customer, in the way of compensation. For me, I never asked for that, although from time to time, I was offered such, after they found out they were in the wrong. Some people, I guess, prefer to be more proactive in this approach. So I guess, for this person on this thread, it deserves some bashing here.

    Ok, let's do it the other way. Let's say you are the CEO, and you decide that no matter what, and it doesn't matter who has done wrong, there will no longer be any "good will credits" or similar kind of compensation. The message to the customers is "bad luck" and "this is life", and the world goes on. I guess it can work, only to the detriment to the company's reputation and public image though. As for the customers, they will feel that they have wasted time and effort for problems that they did not create, and felt bad about choosing this business, and thus, gets frustrated, and will tell 8 x more people than if they have had a happy customer story (by stats in marketing). And thus, the public image of the business will further suffer because of that (especially in the cyber age when communication is so pervasive).

    Customer service has a cost, it's a cost centre, and there are bean counters counting it all the time. I would understand from a perspective, it's wasteful to give them "goodwill credits". But you forgot the cost of a prolonged customer service interaction: it's costing tens of dollars per 15 mins, in a call centre cost; and if that call can be cut short by giving out a goodwill credit of $20; actually the business has a positive financial outcome! (although this cost is a bit lowered now w/ outsourced foreign call centres in India and elsewhere).

    So it's not a simple equation, as to that someone who owns two businesses, should understand. Ethically, customers should not game or trick the system. However, ethically, businesses should right the wrongs they have caused, and compensate the customers if possible, for their inconveniences. For example, if I had to spend 2 hours of my own time to get incorrect billing corrected, they should sympathize this frustration and inconvenience, and extend a sincere apology if not a compensation, at least to mend the relationship with the customer.

    Someone here thinks relationships between business providers and customer demands are adversarial; as enemies. They never think that businesses are about partnership, relationships, rapport, and trust. If they think it is about relationship building and trust earning, then they would not really care if it is about losing that $20. goodwill credit, or actually losing a customer for life, or losing their own reputation out there in the world. Business relationships should be symbiotic, and mutual; and thinking your customers are just thieves or scammers, would do no good.

    I have earned my former life with some limited but indeed high quality training in customer service (although I work in a certain prof trade), and everyone I met who have own or run businesses, have told me the same thing: do your best to keep a customer, as losing one cost more than finding a new one. But I guess some people would not believe this, and think in a narrow, self serving tunnel vision.

    Telus has done a push on "customer first" (or something like that) in recent years, and indeed, I notice that it shows, from my personal experience with them within the same time frame. Rogers has also vowed to push on customer service years ago too, but there is still some kind of gap here and there. I do not wish badly on any of them, because if they can do well, they only benefit me as I have to use their services and products.
    No longer on a leash by Fido

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fortissimo View Post
    To me, I always thought to right a wrong, is the best approach to resolve a problem. However, there are reasons why this preferred method is not used. It could be cost, it could be a technical reason, it could be laziness, or it could be bad policy. But in lieu of this short fall, companies devise a band-aid alternative: "good will credit", or "good will gift". I once wrote a complaint letter to the HQ of a chain of a dollar store because I received a (what I perceived as anyway) rude retail clerk. I did not ask for compensation and just wanted them to know the facts. They sent me a $10. gift card and a letter.

    So there is a person here who said that those who tried to get freebies are tricking the system. For me, I never tried to trick the system, either it's wireless providers, or a retail chain. I much prefer they do a perfect job, and I never have to complain. But if they don't, and I do, I mostly hope that they could resolve the problem, and that they can also resolve their end of the problem so it won't happen to the next customer, thus, I help them to help me, which in return also helps them back. But this isn't a perfect world, and often, this doesn't work.

    And consumers know that; they know that they will never get a company to fix the billing problem (e.g. in my case, it wasn't fixed for 1 whole year), but they also know that, if they whine enough, they would at least get something out of that pain that is given to the customer, in the way of compensation. For me, I never asked for that, although from time to time, I was offered such, after they found out they were in the wrong. Some people, I guess, prefer to be more proactive in this approach. So I guess, for this person on this thread, it deserves some bashing here.

    Ok, let's do it the other way. Let's say you are the CEO, and you decide that no matter what, and it doesn't matter who has done wrong, there will no longer be any "good will credits" or similar kind of compensation. The message to the customers is "bad luck" and "this is life", and the world goes on. I guess it can work, only to the detriment to the company's reputation and public image though. As for the customers, they will feel that they have wasted time and effort for problems that they did not create, and felt bad about choosing this business, and thus, gets frustrated, and will tell 8 x more people than if they have had a happy customer story (by stats in marketing). And thus, the public image of the business will further suffer because of that (especially in the cyber age when communication is so pervasive).

    Customer service has a cost, it's a cost centre, and there are bean counters counting it all the time. I would understand from a perspective, it's wasteful to give them "goodwill credits". But you forgot the cost of a prolonged customer service interaction: it's costing tens of dollars per 15 mins, in a call centre cost; and if that call can be cut short by giving out a goodwill credit of $20; actually the business has a positive financial outcome! (although this cost is a bit lowered now w/ outsourced foreign call centres in India and elsewhere).

    So it's not a simple equation, as to that someone who owns two businesses, should understand. Ethically, customers should not game or trick the system. However, ethically, businesses should right the wrongs they have caused, and compensate the customers if possible, for their inconveniences. For example, if I had to spend 2 hours of my own time to get incorrect billing corrected, they should sympathize this frustration and inconvenience, and extend a sincere apology if not a compensation, at least to mend the relationship with the customer.

    Someone here thinks relationships between business providers and customer demands are adversarial; as enemies. They never think that businesses are about partnership, relationships, rapport, and trust. If they think it is about relationship building and trust earning, then they would not really care if it is about losing that $20. goodwill credit, or actually losing a customer for life, or losing their own reputation out there in the world. Business relationships should be symbiotic, and mutual; and thinking your customers are just thieves or scammers, would do no good.

    I have earned my former life with some limited but indeed high quality training in customer service (although I work in a certain prof trade), and everyone I met who have own or run businesses, have told me the same thing: do your best to keep a customer, as losing one cost more than finding a new one. But I guess some people would not believe this, and think in a narrow, self serving tunnel vision.

    Telus has done a push on "customer first" (or something like that) in recent years, and indeed, I notice that it shows, from my personal experience with them within the same time frame. Rogers has also vowed to push on customer service years ago too, but there is still some kind of gap here and there. I do not wish badly on any of them, because if they can do well, they only benefit me as I have to use their services and products.
    The problem is that the OP was offered a $50- good will, why isn't this sufficent to the OP?
    And even though you are correct about reputation, it seems to have no affect on Rogers. I believe that Rogers is probably the most hated company in Canada, and yetthey have about 9 million customers! more then telus who actually has a much better rep.
    Phones using: Honor Play 6GB 128GB,wife using LG G7 One, son using iPhone XR,daughter using iPhone XR, Youngest son using Xiaomi Redmi 5.

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