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Thread: This is why the N9 doesn't have a future

  1. #1
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    This is why the N9 doesn't have a future

    I know some not so bright people will just look at the link and respond before really thinking about it, but I'll go ahead anyway.

    http://www.engadget.com/2011/08/30/x...tem-explained/

    See that pinch to show the home screens? How it has a 9 icon grid layout? That's pretty similar to N9 multitasking. It's not the exact same thing, but that's not the point. The potential is there, all someone needs to do is cook the functionality the N9 has into an Android UI, and the N9 has very little left to differentiate it.

    Nokia was playing catch-up with the N9 - showing that they can in fact design an innovative and pleasant user interface, but that's what's easy. The hard part is getting the app ecosystem to match, and Nokia unfortunately started putting nails into that coffin with S60v3 where they soured developers to their platform with Symbian Signed. Once they'd been burned by Nokia, why go back to them when there are other successful platforms that haven't burned them yet?
    The word 'Pentaband' means '5 Bands', from the Greek word 'pente' meaning '5'. For a phone to be pentaband it has to support 5 bands. If the phone has AWS support, it doesn't automatically mean that it is pentaband.

    Don't send me PMs for questions that can be asked publicly.

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    Android has a reason for being fractured. It's on a million different phones from a million different handset makers. Symbian has too many variants just on Nokia alone , not to add Maemo and Meego.

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    Quote Originally Posted by migo View Post
    I know some not so bright people will just look at the link and respond before really thinking about it, but I'll go ahead anyway.

    http://www.engadget.com/2011/08/30/x...tem-explained/

    See that pinch to show the home screens? How it has a 9 icon grid layout? That's pretty similar to N9 multitasking. It's not the exact same thing, but that's not the point. The potential is there, all someone needs to do is cook the functionality the N9 has into an Android UI, and the N9 has very little left to differentiate it.

    Nokia was playing catch-up with the N9 - showing that they can in fact design an innovative and pleasant user interface, but that's what's easy. The hard part is getting the app ecosystem to match, and Nokia unfortunately started putting nails into that coffin with S60v3 where they soured developers to their platform with Symbian Signed. Once they'd been burned by Nokia, why go back to them when there are other successful platforms that haven't burned them yet?
    the N9's multitasking is way easier to initiate though: a simple swipe to the right, brings up the multitasking view. In my experience, swiping is much easier than pinching. But I have larger, longer fingers which make the maneuver harder to do (I'm sure others may differ). Furthermore, the N9's multitasking view supports pinching to zoom in/out. For instance, swipe right to go to multitasking, but the screen shows something like 6 apps, zoom out, it will show the total 20 apps you may be running at the time. I see your point, but I don't think android supports "true" multitasking anyway (though this Xiaomi MIUI may have that functionality and we just don't know it yet).

    Your point about this type of functionality being not far off is completely valid though. But the N9's draw just isn't the multitasking (for me, at least). The whole swipe UI is pretty much tailored to the device. And with the availability for custom gestures I think its potential is great, even with the slightly dated specs. Your point about S60v3 is spot on. Great points as usual, I do thoroughly enjoy when you post.

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    I'm thinking depending on the Android implementation, swiping wouldn't work too well, but with Windows Phone, a swipe to the right to bring up the multitasking view makes a lot of sense. Perhaps with Windows Phone 8 we'll get to see the grid layout used by the N9. I can't imagine them not taking on some good ideas.

    I also have to wonder how the true multitasking will affect battery life. I think it makes more sense to have simulated multitasking so the devs have to figure out how to get non-visual features working in the background without using any SOC cycles to continue rendering images people don't see. Battery life obviously isn't a concern in demos, but it is for real life usage, and that's also something Nokia only half understands.

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    Forget about UI/UX, forget how innovative MeeGo is or how basic Android or iOS are, throw all of that out of the window. "The hard part is getting the app ecosystem to match" migo, you could have stopped right here and been dead on. If you don't have strong developer support, your OS isn't going to penetrate the market. I won't go as far to say that apps are everything but it continues to be proven that the platforms with the most developer support are the platforms that are doing the best right now, no matter how you feel about Android or iOS. HP didn't kill webOS, it was near death before they even purchased Palm. Its great UX couldn't mask the fact that it lacks a strong app catalog (pardon the pun)

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    It's not just about getting the app ecosystem to match. Some people legitimately care more about the experience, as long as they can place calls and do a couple other things, and if it were really hard to implement the UI that the N9 uses on another platform, it might have a chance as a niche product. Remember when the iPhone launched it had no apps, but people liked it because of the finger based touch screen experience. The N9 UI definitely looks a lot better than anything else, particularly for multitasking. The problem is just like MIUI does everything the iOS UI does, only several times better, some other enterprising Android ROM Chef could pretty much duplicate the features in the N9 (except maybe keeping half the video playing while slowly sliding off the screen, but that's more a cool tech demo than an actually useful feature). If the choice is N9 UI vs App Ecosystem, most will choose App Ecosystem and a few will choose N9 UI. If the choice is N9 UI or a close copy of N9 on Android with the Android app ecosystem... only Nokia loyalists will pick the N9.

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    ^true, but the multitasking in Android leaves MUCH to be desired.

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    Comparing anything to the iPhone is a flawed example. Apple could start selling oxygen and people would run out to buy it claiming Steve Jobs has revolutionized breathing as his last act as Apple CEO. If any other company had made the original iPhone, exactly how it was for the same price, it would have been a flop. What Apple is best at is making people buy stuff, doesn't matter if someone else makes a similar product with better features or at a better price, Apple makes people want their crap. But I digress.

    Some people will choose UI over app ecosystem but they're in the minority, I haven't exactly figured out WHY developer support (or lack thereof) is tied so closely to the fate of mobile operating systems but I'm trying to break that down in the article I'm currently writing for CellOuts.net.

    There's so much evidence that most people only use a few apps and most apps get downloaded, used once or twice, then never used again yet if you don't have them, your platform fizzles. I have a theory in mind that you'll have to read about to find out

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    ^very true. A buddy of mine has an iPad with like over 200 apps installed on it. I asked him how many of them he uses on a regular basis and the number was like 6.

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    It's a different 6 apps for each person. My girlfriend and I both had iPod touches, her app selection was completely different from mine. We had some overlap in games, but otherwise we didn't use any of the same apps.

    If you go through a list of top 10 or top 20 iOS apps, it's a different list each time for each person. Do the same with Symbian or BlackBerry and the same 5 apps show up each time, with pretty strong overlap with 7-8 of them out of 10. With a small app selection, everyone uses the same apps, and if you're not covered, you're just out of luck.

    That's why Windows has always killed Mac OS - and Mac users hated to admit it. It's all about the third party software available. A smartphone can get around that - because people need it to make calls, so as long as it does that well, a lack of apps isn't crippling, but that doesn't mean they're not incredibly important.

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    Quote Originally Posted by migo View Post
    A smartphone can get around that - because people need it to make calls, so as long as it does that well, a lack of apps isn't crippling, but that doesn't mean they're not incredibly important.
    Quoted for truth. Less focus is being placed on how well a smartphone functions as a phone and most emphasis is being placed on everything else it can do. Hell, some reviews don't even mention how it handles phone calls.

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