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Thread: Big Brother Is Watching - Beware

  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    tell me/us something we didn't know already. i don't even know why privacy is an issue anymore. people gladly give it up with all the materialism afforded them and then want to whine when they're phone/tv/whatever has an option that offers a quick click of media that tends to their likes? why? the smartphone is the best thing that ever happened to corporate/media/advertising/government institutions.
    my phone can't do what your phone can don't.
    how can you start if you forget to begin?

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    Companies have been trying to track consumer tendencies in every way possible for decades - this is not a new trend. For retailers, tracking this information is basically a science - they know a great deal about every one of us based on our purchases. You think loyalty cards are actually to reward you? They are to make it easier to track exactly what you buy. Credit card and magazine companies have been selling your information for ages.

    Smartphones and computers are no different - they just take it to a new level and make it that much easier.
    Scott

    X'ing since 7/24/2010

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by shelland View Post
    Companies have been trying to track consumer tendencies in every way possible for decades - this is not a new trend. For retailers, tracking this information is basically a science - they know a great deal about every one of us based on our purchases. You think loyalty cards are actually to reward you? They are to make it easier to track exactly what you buy. Credit card and magazine companies have been selling your information for ages.

    Smartphones and computers are no different - they just take it to a new level and make it that much easier.
    Spot on

  5. #5
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    What I find amusing is people who post everything about their life in Facebook and other social places then go and complain big brother is watching.
    Current Plan:


    Galaxy Nexus (Pure Google, Jelly Bean)
    6 GB data with tethering
    300 Daytime minutes
    Free call display
    Free message center
    Free Bell to Bell mobility
    Free evenings and weekends (6pm-8am)
    Free 1st minute incoming calls
    Free unlimited txt
    Free call waiting, conference calling, call forward
    Long distance 8 cents Cda, 20 cents USA

    Total with tax: $57 bucks
    Not bad I think.

    Save the Planet, its the only one that sells chocolate.

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    I think the issue is that people want to have privacy on their terms. They want to feel free to reveal the information about themselves they wish to reveal, but not have it done by another party without their consent.
    Samsung Galaxy S4 with KitKat 4.4.2
    I charge forward recklessly, leaving chaos in my wake.
    Boycott phones that lack microSD storage and removable batteries! Do not allow the user experience to be diminished!
    @moonwolf789

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    They want their cake and eat it too, but in the real world that does not always happen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OmegaWolf747 View Post
    I think the issue is that people want to have privacy on their terms. They want to feel free to reveal the information about themselves they wish to reveal, but not have it done by another party without their consent.
    Do you honestly ever read the EULA when you sign up for something? Or any of the text that comes before the "I agree" button when buying or installing an App?
    Because if you don't and click "I agree", there's your consent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlessiaCC View Post
    Do you honestly ever read the EULA when you sign up for something? Or any of the text that comes before the "I agree" button when buying or installing an App?
    Because if you don't and click "I agree", there's your consent.
    hahaha yup.. pretty much

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlessiaCC View Post
    Do you honestly ever read the EULA when you sign up for something? Or any of the text that comes before the "I agree" button when buying or installing an App?
    Because if you don't and click "I agree", there's your consent.
    True, but the real world choice is to either consent to whatever they want or just not use it. It's not like you're going to be able to negotiate different terms. Before you say, "Just don't use it," would you feel the same if you had to sign a EULA to visit your doctor? or purchase groceries? buy gasoline? I'm not saying using Twitter is the same as buying gas for your car, but it is getting to be more "necessary" for more and more people (with a very broad definition of "necessary"). Using email is a necessity for most jobs today, as is having phone service. And, quite frankly, I'm surprised the doctors don't require patients to sign some sort of agreement stripping them of their normal rights before they'll agree to treat them. Perhaps the ethical rules bar that.

    The way the law sometimes works in these situations is to provide some guidelines or boundaries for how one-way contracts work; contracts where one side has all the power. For example, the Uniform Commercial Code is a set of rules governing most commercial transactions, including financial transactions, that have been adopted in every state. The UCC sets up some general rules that limit how far a company can go in structuring a deal. Some state and federal laws do similar things.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sendpaulmailat View Post
    True, but the real world choice is to either consent to whatever they want or just not use it. It's not like you're going to be able to negotiate different terms. Before you say, "Just don't use it," would you feel the same if you had to sign a EULA to visit your doctor? or purchase groceries? buy gasoline? I'm not saying using Twitter is the same as buying gas for your car, but it is getting to be more "necessary" for more and more people (with a very broad definition of "necessary"). Using email is a necessity for most jobs today, as is having phone service. And, quite frankly, I'm surprised the doctors don't require patients to sign some sort of agreement stripping them of their normal rights before they'll agree to treat them. Perhaps the ethical rules bar that.

    The way the law sometimes works in these situations is to provide some guidelines or boundaries for how one-way contracts work; contracts where one side has all the power. For example, the Uniform Commercial Code is a set of rules governing most commercial transactions, including financial transactions, that have been adopted in every state. The UCC sets up some general rules that limit how far a company can go in structuring a deal. Some state and federal laws do similar things.
    I understand what you are saying, but a solution to this problem would be to give the user a choice as to what they allow the app to control. Much like they currently do on Blackberry apps, they should tell you what the app gain access to when the app is installed. The user has the ability to allow or deny the app having access to different phone functions.

    Now, if the user disables something, there is a very good chance that the app will not function correctly, but it should be made obvious to the end-user as to what they are actually granting access to. They should also have the ability to deny any application from having unlimited access to the phone.

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