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Thread: My N900 Report

  1. #91
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    I was reading back in October that this phone does not offer custom ringtone for call/sms for each contact.

    Is this still true? I can't find anything on maemo since most of those topic are old.

    Please let me know if I oculd set a ringtone for SMS and a ringtone for Call for the same person. Thanks

  2. #92
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    Yeah, I don't have an option for ringtone for the contact. Hopefully it comes with the update. Otherwise I will have to just deal without it for now.

    My ringtones usually get messed up because MyFaves kicks in and reverts everything back to the "T-Jingle" annoying ringtone.
    "Hack the Planet!!"

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jn183
    I was reading back in October that this phone does not offer custom ringtone for call/sms for each contact.

    Is this still true? I can't find anything on maemo since most of those topic are old.

    Please let me know if I oculd set a ringtone for SMS and a ringtone for Call for the same person. Thanks
    I believe like all Nokia phones - you can make groups for your contacts and have a different ring tone there. Thus I am sure you can just make 1 group and 1 person in that group and said person could have a different ring tone.

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by ts
    I believe like all Nokia phones - you can make groups for your contacts and have a different ring tone there. Thus I am sure you can just make 1 group and 1 person in that group and said person could have a different ring tone.
    I didn't find where I can create groups?
    The only groups I found are IM groups like skype and gtalk, where the phone integrates your IM contacts and your phone contacts into one big list, and you can change to with the contact of each IM group

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeophyteDMD
    Yeah, I don't have an option for ringtone for the contact. Hopefully it comes with the update. Otherwise I will have to just deal without it for now.

    My ringtones usually get messed up because MyFaves kicks in and reverts everything back to the "T-Jingle" annoying ringtone.
    That's why I rid of myFaves UI in all T-Mobile branded phones that I have used (BB Curve 8900, HTC TP2, Nokia 6263, Nokia 5310, SE TM506, and SE Equinox).
    Phone History: Samsung Galaxy Note 2 | HTC Sensation 4G | Google Nexus One | HTC HD2 | Nokia 5230 Nuron | Nokia N900 | BB Curve 8900 | iPhone 3G | Google Ion | Nokia 5800XM | Nokia E71-2 | T-Mobile G1 | iPhone 2G

    My Feedbacks: eBay | Heatware | HoFo

  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by ts
    I believe like all Nokia phones - you can make groups for your contacts and have a different ring tone there. Thus I am sure you can just make 1 group and 1 person in that group and said person could have a different ring tone.
    Thanks. Not a bad idea. I will give it a try when I receive the phone tomorrow.

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by sr1329
    That's all well and good, but what about power output? The output stage is terrible. I am using 70 ohm headphones, but other devices have no problems driving them.

    In a mobile setting 4dB of dynamic range means nothing (and I can explain this to you fully if you wish - just go and read up on what dynamic range means first). What matters is the ability of the device to drive a headphone and this device is just bad. I wish it were different because I wanted one excuse to keep it and that was going to be my excuse.

    You have heard it, what do you think? Have you compared to 5800XM? Using which headphones?

    I used Sennheiser HD-25-1 (best portable closed phones), Shure SE530, UE Triple.fi, and even Grado SR-225. I could connect the AKG K701 if I wanted but I know it's a waste of time, even some home headphone amps struggle with that one.

    What do you think of the in built speakers?

    Somebody let me know if they are impressed with the sound coming out of this device. Maybe I got a defective one. I don't know why nobody out there offers any opinion on anything. Even when the N97 came out people were more excited talking about all aspects of the device.

    If I had to say what the N900 sounds like I would say N95. We all know that N78, 5800XM are far better sounding.
    yes, of course we believe U just by word which stands Vs. real laboratory test, of course we believe you, really

    There are 2 independent opinions (from an audiohile and lab test) stating that N900 delivers better sound than ipods so please do not prove that black is white becouse you will not prove it - rather than that you will make your opinions about N900 even less trustwirthy (if it is still possible).

    I guess this forum need honest approach not apple fanboism / nokia hateism

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by elleberth
    yes, of course we believe U just by word which stands Vs. real laboratory test, of course we believe you, really

    There are 2 independent opinions (from an audiohile and lab test) stating that N900 delivers better sound than ipods so please do not prove that black is white becouse you will not prove it - rather than that you will make your opinions about N900 even less trustwirthy (if it is still possible).

    I guess this forum need honest approach not apple fanboism / nokia hateism

    You can't even read a result correctly. Intermodulation distortion is one of the most audible forms of distortion in audio. As for harmonic distortion there is even order and odd order. The results don't tell you which one is prominent. Even order distortion is audibly masked since all sounds have natural even order harmonic components. however odd order distortion is easily audible.

    The truth about things like noise or S/N ratio or dynamic range is that they don't matter in the real world in a portable setting.

    Since you clearly don't understand the first thing about audio I guess I have to explain.

    In a portable setting background noise from your environment is at least 55dB and usually much higher. Even in a quiet car you looking at 60-70dB of noise. In a subway train the number is more like 86dB: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2438596/

    So if a chipset offers a dynamic range of 120dB then you must listen at 120dB ABOVE the ambient noise to appreciate the dynamic range or S/N ratio of the component. In the case of a subway car that is 206dB. If you exposed your ears to that for about half a second you would go deaf.

    If you used high quality attenuating earphones like the Etymotic ER4-S which feature about 26dB of passive attenuation then the number drops to 180dB which again would make you deaf in about 2-3 seconds. If you didn't know that the decibel scale is a logarithmic scale then you know now. That means +10dB is TEN TIMES the power. +3dB is about double the power.

    What you need to understand first of all is that apart from IM distortion and and odd-order harmonics most other such measurements are not useful in the real world. At home in a quiet room with room treatments and high end speakers it does matter.

    Most of today's chipsets perform at the DAC stage more than adequately for portable audio. The problem is at the analog stage where the stage must be designed to properly drive earphones. They must be able to deliver sufficient amounts of voltage and current without distorting. These are usually an afterthought because people don't really test for those factors. They know that as long as it performs well at the digital stage and can feed a spectrum analyzer there will be uninformed people like yourself who will repeat a set of numbers they don't really understand.

    I don't know what Apple is using in their iPod/iPhone but it is better than what is in the N900. They too had very good numbers in the past and now thanks to employing high quality Wolfson DACs (pretty much anything anyone uses these days is excellent compared to what we had even 3 years ago) but their analog stages were crap. Utter crap. There was bass roll-off which you can find information on anywhere. They were not really capable of driving headphones very well. With the first iPod shuffle they moved to a push-pull amplifier design which performed a lot better in things that matter to portable audio. Anyone who knows anything about audio will argue that single-ended is better. It is better if it is implemented correctly. To do so requires a lot more power use, bigger capacitors and careful design. The difference between single ended and push pull is inaudible in the portable setting. At home in a $50,000 stereo it is. Apple have since greatly improved their output stages since the backlash they received about the poor output stages in all the iPods right up the 4G. They were bad. They have gotten their design to the point where the iPod touch is considered one of the best sounding players from the headphone jack on the market along with the Cowon S9 and Sony X-series. Thanks to the Wolfson DAC they were great players from the line-out even in the first generation. I used to use my 4G with a line out dock to various high end amplifier to my high end headphones so I know.

    I think you need to go and read to acquire basic knowledge about audio before you come here running numbers to me. You failed to even interpret the numbers in terms of actual relevance to sound quality. Its easy to spout out numbers but you need to understand what they mean. Someone will then say stereo separation as as if it were a big deal. It really isn't in practice. the L and R signals in music are similar with very few differences. You can connect your speakers such that you actually hear L-R. It was what Dolby used for years to simulate "surround sound" it was called matrix surround. If anything a poor number like -30dB would cause a smaller soundstage. If you knew anything about audio you would know that the mere fact you are listening on a headphone KILLS the soundstage more than the worst channel separation you would ever find even on equipment that was designed 30 years ago.

    Seriously go spend some time on Head-Fi. I'm not trying to pull wool over your eyes, I'm directing you to a place where you can educate yourself. They are fairly balanced bunch over there and they focus on headphone audio. If you need more technical knowledge try Audioasylum but beware of the "old school" audiofools. They are far too subjective for my tastes. There is still lots of good technical knowledge there. If that doesn't work check out DIY audio websites. Those guys know what they are talking about.

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