Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Cell phone for teaching a college course?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2
    Feedback Score
    0

    Cell phone for teaching a college course?

    I'm planning to teach a college course on Developing Mobile Phone Apps starting in the spring. I'm looking for a phone and a commonly used platform on which to base the course. I've narrowed down my search as follows: I'm looking for a phone with particular characteristics:
    (1) It can handle many of the apps that you'd want to program on a phone, (2) You can transfer apps that you develop on your computer directly to the phone without going through the phone company's network, if possible (3) Phone companies don't have a huge surcharge for the phone's data connection (for example, I don't want AT&T to charge me $30/month just for the data because they consider it to be a smartphone), and finally (4) Students can buy the phone at a not-too-exorbitant price without having to get a 2-year contract.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    43
    Device(s)
    G1
    Carrier(s)
    Tmobile
    Feedback Score
    0

    Android?

    My thought would be to use Android because the developer's kit is freely available and they even give you a PC emulator so people can run their software without even having an Android phone. Apps can be transferred to the phone via USB cable, no telco involvement or "app store" required.

    Unfortunately, there isn't (at least today) an easy way to get an affordable non-contract Android phone that I know of. IF someone knows of one, please tell me, I want that, too!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Mississauga, Ontario
    Posts
    2,321
    Device(s)
    Samsung Galaxy S7, Galaxy S4, iPhone 6S Plus
    Carrier(s)
    Fido (Data-Only)
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by blakdawg
    My thought would be to use Android because the developer's kit is freely available and they even give you a PC emulator so people can run their software without even having an Android phone. Apps can be transferred to the phone via USB cable, no telco involvement or "app store" required.

    Unfortunately, there isn't (at least today) an easy way to get an affordable non-contract Android phone that I know of. IF someone knows of one, please tell me, I want that, too!
    Your list of "advantages" applies to pretty much all smartphone platforms EXCEPT the iPhone. Blackberry, Symbian, and Windows Mobile have free development tools, phone emulators for the PC, and compiled applications can be uploaded to the phones via USB cable.

    As much as I like the Symbian O/S (used almost exclusively on Nokia phones) I would recommend AGAINST it for a teaching tool, if for no other reason than because you'll waste more time teaching them the WEIRDNESS of the Symbian "way" than you will teaching them the fundamentals of smartphone application development.

    What you might want to consider is teaching them Java applet development instead of picking any one specific smartphone platform. Pretty much every smartphone (and many feature phones too) supports a Java Virtual Machine, allowing them to run stock Java applets.

    Java is a modern object-oriented development language with a reasonably easy-to-understand class library. Development tools (such as Eclipse and NetBeans) are free and readily available. They support JVM emulation, allowing for development without the need to constantly install the applet onto a phone.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    2,150
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile
    Feedback Score
    0
    I agree with the java suggestion. Just about any phone can run java apps. So there is a good chance that all the students will have java capable phones already. And the ones that don't can easily obtain one and just run it offline.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    3
    Feedback Score
    0
    Yes java applications would be more capable and there would be some teaching about cell phone amplifier which includes some hardware part of cell phones. So try to think about that idea.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Los Angeles area & PA/NJ, USA
    Posts
    17,403
    Device(s)
    Nexus One
    Carrier(s)
    AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    i agree with the java recommendation. 6 months ago i decided to try to learn how to write apps for symbian s60v5 and boy was it a nightmare. i never got anywhere because frankly its just waaay too difficult. it would take you 3 months of SIGNIFICANT work just to be at the beginner stage with symbian. android, windows mobile, or even the iphone would be much better. however the java recommendation is the best solution because any phone can run a java app.
    Current Device: Nexus One
    Phone History: |N97 Mini| |5800| |E71-2| |N95-4| |N95-3| |N75| |6131| |6230| |SE T616|


    | My HoFo Feedback |

Bookmarks