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Thread: Garmin Nuvifone G60 - one year contract?

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Garmin Nuvifone G60 - one year contract?

    Anyone know if it is at all possible to get the Nuvifone on a one year contract instead of two?

    I played with the G60 at an ATT store today (3rd Oct). Lady had to get it out from the back. Didn't get to see anything great because somehow her ATT Work SIM never worked okay. She didn't even know about the phone until I asked her about it. It felt very nice in my hand. Not gimmicky. Felt like a phone and not a toy.
    Said a display model will be available tomorrow (4th Oct) to try. Only one actual phone in stock available for purchase. Only tonight did I see ATT had the phone on their site. Would've thought it would be promoted a bit earlier.

    Later in the day, I phoned ATT and asked if the unit can be unlocked for travel to Europe and the CSR lady said yes. Been an ATT customer for three years so they could unlock straight away (bonus!) Let's see if this actually happens!

    I think I saw somewhere online that a two year commitment will bring cost to $300. If you get a one year commitment, it will be $375. Just wanting any clarification.
    Due for an upgrade so wonder what I can get the phone for? Hmmn...?

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    does gps work without service as a stand alone

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    Garmin Nuvifone G60

    My understanding is that you can buy it out right for $549.99 or two year contract for $399.99, but they have a rebate for $100. It will be interesting to see if they have a one year option.

    The GPS works totally independent of the cell phone carrier. Here is an excerpt about just that "...Since all maps are preloaded, you don't have to worry about not getting directions when you're in a remote area out of cell coverage..."
    http://garmin.blogs.com/my_weblog/20...gs-but-no.html

    http://www.wireless.att.com/cell-pho...ngarmin=garmin

    http://www8.garmin.com/nuvifone/

    I think it will be interesting to see how long it takes for others stores that carry AT&T phones to have this. Radio Shack and Best Buy both carry AT&T phones, but I wonder if they will have this.

    There are some You Tube videos on this as well.
    Last edited by Jim1348; 10-04-2009 at 10:14 AM. Reason: Details

  4. #4
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    I know a lot of people say the UI is outdated but I actually like the simplicity. I have ahad a SE P990i, iPhone 2G, Treo 680 and as much as I have enjoyed using smartphones, the thing I really wanted in my next phone was GPS. I actually have a TomTom unit, but there have been many times I have not taken it with me (certainly don't leave it in the car!) and then I found I needed to get somewhere.
    People laud the iPhone navigation, but as I understand it, it doesn't do true GPS (or does it?) Having a GPS unit that is also a phone (instead of a phone that also does GPS), seems a better option for true on the go needs in one device. Will go out in a while and see if I can actually have a good hands-on with it. Will see if I can send Contacts via SMS. Why do "smart"phones today not let you send Contact info via SMS/Bluetooth or let you send a photo file via Bluetooth (yes you iPhone!)?
    Will ask many questions

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    The nuvifone from AT&T is a mixed bag. They removed some of the features of the unlocked Asian Pacific version. One of those features was tethering. Others are a business card OCR app and a RSS newsfeed reader. The locked phone needs an AT&T sim in order to use the GPS but the sim can be an expired sim. All you get is a message that says "SIM not provisioned MM #2". If you unlock it then all the GPS features are available without the SIM.

    It is really a GPS with phone functionality. Almost everything option is integrated with some GPS functionality. But it is compatible with other Garmin products so you can download applications from Garmin's website and load maps and custom POI.

  6. #6
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    So, I was able to have a play with it today and it was quite nice. No ability to send Contact via SMS . Didn't have a chance to see if I could send a photo/file via bluetooth.
    The touch screen seemed quite responsive. Did not like the ABCD keyboard layout in Portrait mode. Was able to try a quick route search and the map result seemed clear and bright. The computer voice sounded okay too. Am guessing you can get more voices from Garmin site. The phone was security attached at the store so was limited in how to try it out.
    Quote Originally Posted by kingstu
    They removed some of the features of the unlocked Asian Pacific version. One of those features was tethering. Others are a business card OCR app and a RSS newsfeed reader.[...]If you unlock it then all the GPS features are available without the SIM.
    Once it is unlocked (and ATT said they would unlock it for int'l use), does that mean the tethering and RSS will become "available"? Hopefully in the next weeks/months, we'll see some nice user hacks/tips to modify it

    My contract with ATT finishes this week and I am sorely tempted to go and get it, but it is pricey. Anyone have a suggestion as to how long to wait for a price drop? Thinking to get one for both myself and wife. Will be great to both have it:
    "Where are you honey?"
    "I think I am at [blah blah blah] but am not sure...."
    "Gimme a sec...ah! I can meet you in 20 mins. You're at [blah blah blah]"
    The Ciao! feature seems quite handy.
    Thought it would also be a great "security" feature by having a proper GPS in the phone. Not only is having a cell really handy, but if you were stuck you can use the "Where Am I?" feature to ask for help.

    I sent myself an SMS of the current location from the planned route and it comes as a URL in the text message. Only handy if the person you are sending it to can access data on their cell plan.

    Overall, I really liked it. Now the waiting game begins...come on ATT....drop the price!!!

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    anyone know how it might compare to a htc touch or other phone running garmin xt mobile

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    I know the garmin developer site has the unix source code for the AT&T version as well as the APAC version. If anyone is bold enough to figure out the difference and also figure out how to modify and/or hack it then I would love to see what happens. Maybe with source it could be hacked to give give features and remove features we don't like, hehehe.

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    Ic0nBoy, did you get a chance to make a few calls with the phone? I would interested in hearing about the call quality, volume and reception.

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    The nuvi 1690 GPS is 499 top of line model, if they price the nuviphone less it would end up losing sales to their other models

  11. #11
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    AT&T has also removed the Google Local Search from the version they sell. The APAC version seems like a much better device. I have the AT&T version and it's voice quality seems fine but the screen saver seems to black out the screen all the time when I am calling and I am taking some time getting used to it. It feels quality but it also feels like AT&T reduced a lot of useful functionality.

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    PC Mag Review Of The Garmin nuvifone G60 (AT&T)

    PC Mag did not rate it very high:

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2353744,00.asp

    Garmin nuvifone G60 (AT&T)

    REVIEW DATE:10.05.09
    Ratings

    EditorFair

    Rate This Product
    CHECK PRICES

    $150
    Amazon $149.99
    by Jamie Lendino
    discuss Total posts: 1

    Many cell phones offer optional GPS navigation services. Even standalone GPS vendors like TomTom and Navigon now offer iPhone apps. But the Garmin nuvifone G60 is a first: a Linux-powered cell phone and bonafide Garmin GPS device in one. That means you get text-to-speech capability, a database with millions of points of interest, and full-blown search capabilities. Unfortunately, Garmin spent almost two years bringing this phone to market, and it feels like a 2007-era device. At $299 with a two-year contract after a $100 mail-in rebate, the nuvifone G60 simply isn't competitive.

    Design and Call Quality
    The rubberized G60 looks pedestrian. It measures 4.4 by 2.3 by 0.6 inches (HWD) and weighs 4.8 ounces. It's fashioned in charcoal-colored rubber with chrome plastic bands on the sides and back panel. One oddity is the side-mounted docking port, which plugs into the included GPS mount for your dashboard. However, there's no DC power adapter in the box for charging the G60 while driving. The 2.5mm headphone jack works with many cell-phone headsets, but not music headphones. The 3.6-inch, 272-by-480-pixel resistive plastic touch screen worked OK for thumb taps, but felt old school compared with today's glass LCDs and AMOLED panels. Typing on the on-screen QWERTY keyboard was pretty accurate, though it had no haptic feedback, and the predictive text mode worked well. The accelerometer rotates the phone's UI when you rotate the phone.
    View Slideshow See all (9) slides
    More

    The nuvifone G60 is a quad-band EDGE (850/1900/1800/1900 MHz) and tri-band HSDPA (850/1900/2100 MHz) device with Wi-Fi. Calls sounded crisp and clear in both directions, with no background hiss. Voices in the earpiece had a little hollow echo around them, but it wasn't too bad. Reception was excellent; usually the G60 was a bar ahead of a nearby iPhone 3G on HSDPA signal strength. Calls also sounded fine through a Plantronics Voyager Pro Bluetooth headset. The speakerphone went relatively loud but sounded harsh, and it distorted horribly near maximum volume. Battery life was good at 5 hours and 17 minutes of talk time.

    GPS Navigation
    So what makes this GPS phone special? It's a Garmin PND crammed into a cell phone. The nuvifone G60's 4GB of onboard storage contains 2GB of U.S. and Canadian maps, and the assisted GPS receiver includes the company's HotFix technology. The G60's GPS features work in areas with little cellular coverage—or even without the AT&T SIM installed, for that matter. In my tests, the G60 always started up quickly and locked onto my location within seconds, even in a rural part of Massachusetts. That compared well with a current-model, Editors' Choice-winning Garmin nüvi 265T I had on hand and bested many GPS-enabled cell phones I've tested.

    Typing in addresses or searching for points of interest was a breeze with the on-screen QWERTY keyboard and animated UI graphics. You can also search for points of interest with your voice. Once underway, the nuvifone was a great navigator. GPS accuracy, directions, road data, and voice prompts were identical between the phone and the dedicated GPS. The G60 displayed the same level of map detail (at the same zoom level) as the nüvi 265T and popped up similar speed limit signs in all the right places.

    A few nits: once I went off route, recalculations took a beat or two longer than the standalone unit. The results were always identical. There's no on-screen lane assistance for complex exit ramps, but that's also true of the standalone nüvi 265T. The Garmin G60 dimmed the backlight whenever it wasn't speaking to conserve battery life—fine, but a consequence of the missing power cable. The only real difference in operation was speaker volume. The G60's voice prompts were clear but tinny and not very loud even at maximum volume. (The speakerphone distortion wasn't present in this mode.) The nüvi 265T's speaker sounded smoother over highway road noise and went considerably louder.

    Garmin preloads several additional services, including a flight status lookup, a YellowPages.com app, and a currency converter. You can also search by intersections and find cities by name. For $5.99 per month extra, Garmin's Nuvifone Premium Connected Services add real-time traffic, white pages look-up, weather data, movie times, local events, and fuel price comparisons. That's a tough sell over other AT&T cell phones, many of which offer the excellent TeleNav-powered AT&T Navigator for $9.99 including real-time traffic and free map updates. Still, the G60 is the best cell-phone-based GPS navigation device I've ever tested.

    UI, Multimedia, and Conclusions
    If only the rest of the phone measured up. Let's start with the Linux-powered G60's user interface, which is completely different than most other smartphones. The home screen straddles the line between a navigation device and a cell phone. Three big, colorful icons cover making calls, viewing the map, and running searches. A separate large ribbon scrolls through other common tasks, such as the music player and camera. There's a document viewer on board for displaying Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and PDF files, though you can't edit them.

    Messaging fans should choose a different phone. The G60 supports threaded text messaging and Gmail, Hotmail, AOL mail, POP3, and IMAP e-mail accounts. But there's no MMS, no video messaging, and no instant messaging client (such as for AIM or Yahoo Messenger) on board. In addition, all social networking duties are handled by a location-based, proprietary service called "Ciao." Ciao wasn't activated on my handset, so I couldn't test it.

    The Web browser rendered HTML pages very nicely, but it was sluggish even with a strong 3G signal. The 3.2-megapixel camera includes auto-focus and geotagging capability, but most photos ended up useless due to the poor focus, slow shutter speed, and blown-out highlights. There are no picture configuration options. You can send a photo as an e-mail attachment but not save photos to a memory card or otherwise transfer them without syncing to a PC over USB. At least the side-mounted microSD card slot lets you sideload music; my 16GB SanDisk card worked fine. MP3 tracks sounded bright but flat over a pair of Motorola S9-HD Bluetooth headphones.

    The G60 has no video player, no video recorder, no streamed media services, no way to purchase music tracks over-the-air, and no downloadable games or other apps. The total lack of apps actually means it doesn't fulfill our definition of a smartphone, although AT&T is selling it as such.

    Finally, there's that high $299 price. The Garmin nuvifone G60 costs $100 more than the far more flexible 16GB iPhone 3GS and $200 higher than the $99, second-generation iPhone 3G, both of which have diverse GPS options. The QWERTY slider LG Xenon GR500's GPS software isn't as powerful, but it has far better messaging and multimedia capabilities than the nuvifone. Even the lower-end Samsung Solstice outdoes the G60 on features and rings in at $49.99—that's $250 less. None of these devices offers the same accurate GPS power as the Garmin G60. But all are much more versatile handhelds. It's like Garmin gave up halfway through the development cycle and released what it had.

    Benchmark Test Results
    Continuous Talk Time: 5 hours 17 minutes

  13. #13
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    It's a GPS with phone features. Not a phone with GPS. If you buy it with that in mind then you know exactly what you are getting. I just got one and I am learning so much about it. It is definitely different...but also very unique.

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    Garmin Nuvifone G60

    You pointed out something interesting about the missing Google Search feature. As it gets into more hands around the world it will be interesting to see what modifications can be made.

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    Garmin Nuvifone G60 GPS Phone Review: Do Not Buy

    Wow, the Gizmodo author isn't shy about his feelings!

    http://gizmodo.com/5374720/garmin-nu...iew-do-not-buy


    Garmin makes the best portable navigators out there. Millions of people, including me, are fans. But following notoriously lengthy delays, the first Nuvifone should have been euthanized, not put on AT&T shelves next to the iPhone—for $100 more.

    The Nuvifone G60 GPS phone is out this week for $300, an absurdly high price for even a smartphone in this age. But the Nuvifone is not a smartphone, not even a clever one.

    Nuvi vs Nuvifone

    *
    *
    *
    *

    What's Bad

    • The resistive touchscreen reminds me of phones circa 2006, bad for everything but big-button tapping.

    • There's no homescreen button, to quickly take you out of a mire of menus.

    • It's crashy—screens froze twice while I was writing this, forcing a full-on hard restart.

    • Sometimes the accelerometer just stops working completely.

    • The camera is terrible—if the hardware button required for the shutter even works—and there's no video of any kind.

    • The web browser is all but useless, because it relies heavily on zooming in and out, and the touchscreen easily confuses swiping and tapping.

    • The interface looks cool at first, but there are strange design choices throughout. Want an example? The QWERTY keyboard only appears in horizontal mode—it's ABCDE in vertical mode. Also, no "Where To?" button, a la older Nuvi devices.

    • You have to pay a $5/month premium charge to check the weather, traffic, local events and other services—all of which can be found on free apps from real smartphone platforms (not just iPhone).

    • Even when using email (let alone calendar), there doesn't seem to be any awareness of the rest of the internet: The email wizard lets you enter any address and password, but it doesn't say whether it can actually get mail. This tenacious little phone is still trying to log onto my Hotmail account.

    • The battery ran down completely during my first day of testing, after a few phone calls and some modest GPS navigation, and the battery indicator drops fast when it's just on standby. In fairness, you shouldn't use this phone or any other phone without a car charger, if you intend to use it for GPS navigation.

    • There is no car charger. It's missing the $7 USB-to-cig-lighter adapter. AT&T probably wanted to sell it separately, but when I asked at my local AT&T store, they didn't even carry it.

    • Since it's an AT&T phone, it has to compete with the iPhone and other handsets that are way better. If the Nuvifone were on Verizon, it would at least have a network advantage in certain markets that it could lord over the iPhone herd. But even Apple haters would have a hard time spending an extra $100 on this—with the exact same phone reception.

    Nuvifone Features

    *
    *
    *
    *

    The Verdict

    Unlike most reviews, this verdict isn't for you. If you made it to the end of the headline, you already know what to do. But because I care, I thought I'd say something to the makers:

    Garmin: Please get your act together in the phone space. You have two choices: Either make tidy useful navigation apps for the major platforms, or make real phones. There's no such thing as a PND that also makes phone calls (though I think that was the original plan for the G60).

    You are great in your field, but even teamed with Asus, you aren't better than the lowliest phone maker, so you have to play catchup: Pick a mobile OS and stick with it. Skip Windows Mobile (for now) and make a serious push into Android. To do that, you'll have to see what everyone else is doing. Don't just set yourself up to lose in the end to an HTC running a TeleNav or TomTom app. You're good at making tough hardware, so why not differentiate with a rugged outdoor Android smartphone?

    I urge you to re-consider your premature departure from the mobile app business. Garmin brand equity would sell a lot of iPhone apps, especially if they came with the Nuvi interface most people love more than TomTom's or Navigon's. It may bruise the ego a bit to focus on software instead of hardware, but I just don't see how successful you can be by doing what everyone else is doing, only later and worse. I didn't mean to be this harsh, but I also didn't expect the G60 to be so bad.
    In Brief

    The home screen is cool for a dumbphone, with three major buttons and a slider of auxiliary options

    The navigational experience I have enjoyed on regular Nuvis is here, almost completely intact, but since you can already get that without buying this phone, it's not a major plus

    See above—like, every single word of this piece

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