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Thread: AT&T Acquires 700Mhz Spectrum In WA & OR

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    AT&T Acquires 700Mhz Spectrum In WA & OR

    http://www.dailywireless.org/2009/09...s-bigger-boat/

    “What Vulcan really had here is a play in the Pacific Northwest and presumably AT&T has given him an offer he couldn’t refuse,” said Jim Wiesenberg, a principal at wireless spectrum consulting firm WW Associates.

    Paul Allen – billionaire – has sold his 700 MHZ licenses he acquired in 2003 to AT&T for an undisclosed price, reports Bloomberg. The 24 wireless licenses cover spectrum in parts of Washington State and Oregon, including the cities of Seattle and Portland, according to documents filed with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (pdf).

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    Look at the map that Verizon has then look at AT&T, why does Verizon have like almost the whole country taken, and AT&T has only certain spots?


    but I am happy Detroit is one of the places they have both B/C block 700mhz spec

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    Because VZW purchased a complete nationwide 700MHz license, while AT&T did not.

    VZW has the 'C' block, which requires open access as a stipulation, and spent 9.6 billion on it. AT&T spent 3 billion less, got what they wanted (most major cities) and doesn't have the FCC 'rules'.

    VZW actually purchased the complete C block + large pieces of A and B blocks. I'm not surprised that VZW will be aggressively building, as they'll need return on this investment. The bad part of this is that the licensed spectrum is relatively small. 11-22 MHz (paired) = 6-11 MHz x 2.
    AT&T... your world, throttled.

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    Hopefully 700mhz will fix LA

    AT&T was very aggressive in buying a lot of 700mhz spectrum in LA. They have much more than anybody else. Hopefully this means that when AT&T debuts 4G in LA AT&T will have by far the best coverage.

    Will 700mhz penetrate better and farther than 850mhz?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kesem
    AT&T was very aggressive in buying a lot of 700mhz spectrum in LA. They have much more than anybody else. Hopefully this means that when AT&T debuts 4G in LA AT&T will have by far the best coverage.

    Will 700mhz penetrate better and farther than 850mhz?
    Yes to a point but not as dramatic as 1900 vs 850.
    2G = GSM and CDMA
    3G = UMTS, UMB and Wimax
    EVDO = TDMA
    CDMA + EVDO = 3G?

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    Every little bit will be very significant in LA. The dead zones in Hollywood/Beverly Hills which force calls to drop here are as small as fifty yards.

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    Does this mean we'll start having hex-band gsm phones (700/850/900/1800/1900/2100mhz)?

    No wonder we get so many dropped calls...

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    Quote Originally Posted by formercanuck
    Because VZW purchased a complete nationwide 700MHz license, while AT&T did not.

    VZW has the 'C' block, which requires open access as a stipulation, and spent 9.6 billion on it. AT&T spent 3 billion less, got what they wanted (most major cities) and doesn't have the FCC 'rules'.

    VZW actually purchased the complete C block + large pieces of A and B blocks. I'm not surprised that VZW will be aggressively building, as they'll need return on this investment. The bad part of this is that the licensed spectrum is relatively small. 11-22 MHz (paired) = 6-11 MHz x 2.


    So do you guys think AT&T did a good job at buying their share? I want to know what you mean by they don't need to follow the FCC "rules" and when you say the bad part is the licensed spectrum is relatively small? I thought they had the whole country?? What do you mean by 11-22 MHz (paired) = 6-11 MHz x 2. I am sorry I don't know about this stuff, but I love to learn about this kind of stuff anytime.

    Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaldo
    So do you guys think AT&T did a good job at buying their share? I want to know what you mean by they don't need to follow the FCC "rules" and when you say the bad part is the licensed spectrum is relatively small? I thought they had the whole country?? What do you mean by 11-22 MHz (paired) = 6-11 MHz x 2. I am sorry I don't know about this stuff, but I love to learn about this kind of stuff anytime.

    Thanks.
    I doubt the open access rules will mean much. Having devices that accept SIM cards would probably meet that requirement, and AT&T has always had SIM cards. Hopefully VZW will have SIM cards for LTE.

    As far as other differences in FCC rules between the nationwide "C" block and the other 700 MHz blocks: http://howardforums.com/showpost.php...0&postcount=87
    AT&T's requirements are a lot more strict than VZW's. VZW may have a nationwide license but can get away with not actually building coverage on most of the land. Not so for AT&T.

    For the rural areas where AT&T still has no native coverage after the Alltel divestiture acquisitions, AT&T really needs the 850 MHz license and the associated (already built) network more than 700 MHz spectrum (amount of spectrum isn't really an issue in the very rural areas because there aren't enough people to overload the network). That means they need to buy out the smaller carriers still holding 850 licenses, starting with US Cellular, which holds 850 licenses in areas like rural Iowa, inland Maine, and in parts of the Southeast near the Appalachians where AT&T has poor coverage and no low band spectrum. In some areas, acquiring the existing network and towers would make meeting their build requirements for the 700 MHz A, B, and E blocks much easier, since the backhaul would be already in place and they'd just have to put new antennas on the towers. 850 MHz build requirements were the most strict of all, so any network meeting those requirements should most likely meet the 700 MHz requirements by default.

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    And WHY do you think that people complain when PCS carriers (or carriers that have PCS only licenses in a particular rural area) do not full cover it, while carriers like VZW (which has an 850MHz license in almost every MTA, or at least every rural MTA) has decent service.

    Urban coverage is one thing... its where most people are, and they are the ones paying for service. Some rural areas have only highway traffic for MILES, and even then... very few.

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    I just don't want to see AT&T go down the stupid road of starting a diff freq like they did 3G with 1900 and then after they hear 3476246523452 complains they move it to 850 ex( NY). So do you guys think they are on the right track? I am happy where I live Detroit is both licenses .

    Also do you think this is it for the 700mhz? It seams like parts of Florida they have so much 850mhz license they left areas without getting a 700mhz spec so they can't even put 4G there, or would they have to put it on a different freq?

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    I still don't get this, so all the areas that are white on AT&T's map they cannot deploy no 700mhz spectrum to nothing? So does that mean no 4G there?? Would they have to put it on a different frequency? If so what?

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