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Thread: Roaming in Canada (Toronto)- which towers?

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    Roaming in Canada (Toronto)- which towers?

    Does anybody know which carrier's towers Verizon uses when roaming in Toronto, ON, Canada?

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    Quote Originally Posted by estew72
    Does anybody know which carrier's towers Verizon uses when roaming in Toronto, ON, Canada?
    mainly telus

    oh, and it's 69 cents a minute for roaming, unless you have the nationwide + canada plan

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    If I understand correctly, the roaming agreement is between Verizon and Bell for that area, not Telus. It would be Telus if you were further west....

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    Telus is the preferred roaming partner, Bell Mobility is second choice (backup). See the PRL interpretation for more details.

    PRL Interpretations
    XFF's AlphaTag software
    Cellular and PCS License Maps
    Quote Originally Posted by gpatrick900
    I am a little confused. My Verizon phone was able to roam on GSM because they used TDMA. Tell it was shutdown. The phone recognizes it as Analog. If PCS has TDMA, It could be technically be used on GSM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tabla View Post
    Y'know, I'm used to hysterical 14-year-old ******** on the internet, but this is exceptional. Never before in human history have so many nerds hyperventilated so publicly over so little.

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    ...and be glad it is Telus.

    Bell for whatever reason started requiring "1" to be added before dialing calls that would be long-distance for roamers, regardless of their ability to make all calls without incurring long-distance charges. This assinine position started just over a year ago. North America's Choice (now Nationwide + Canada) users could just dial NPA-NXX-YYYY and have all calls connected on Bell. Now they get the message "you must first dial 1+ area code and the number to calls which long distance charges apply" regardless of the dumb fact that for the call long distance charges do not apply! On Telus this works flawlessly.

    The "Bell problem" started roughly at the same time as they started delivering SMS and VM indicator messages to Verizon handsets. Bell refuses to recognize the problem and trying to explain "Canada" to a Verizon customer service rep is akin to explaining the space shuttle to a caveman.

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    Quote Originally Posted by caveat71
    ...and be glad it is Telus.

    Bell for whatever reason started requiring "1" to be added before dialing calls that would be long-distance for roamers, regardless of their ability to make all calls without incurring long-distance charges. This assinine position started just over a year ago. North America's Choice (now Nationwide + Canada) users could just dial NPA-NXX-YYYY and have all calls connected on Bell. Now they get the message "you must first dial 1+ area code and the number to calls which long distance charges apply" regardless of the dumb fact that for the call long distance charges do not apply! On Telus this works flawlessly.
    Not sure why that would be a problem. Is dialing an extra digit really that burdensome? Besides, technically it's correct to dial the country code first, then the area code, the exchange code, and finally the station code. And most modern handsets should have an "international assist" option that automatically prepends the missing country code for US subscriber numbers saved in 10-digit format.
    The "Bell problem" started roughly at the same time as they started delivering SMS and VM indicator messages to Verizon handsets. Bell refuses to recognize the problem and trying to explain "Canada" to a Verizon customer service rep is akin to explaining the space shuttle to a caveman.
    Of course VZW CSRs can't answer regarding policies and procedure implemented by foreign operators. What did you expect?

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    It's a problem when its not required in the US and all your numbers are +1 free. +1 was dropped by all the US carriers when LD became extinct. Canadian carriers announced the end of +1 dialing requirements but people erupted in protest since they wouldn't know if the call they were making was LD or not. Their answer was to tell all users to +1 all their phonebook entries or turn on +1 prepend. Canada still is LD for anyone outside their local calling areas (usually based on a metro area). So in reality its the same thing just the extra digit. It should be within NANPA that +1 is not required. Calling outside NANPA numbers should include country code.

    Telus customers (native to Telus) are required to +1 their calls, but exempt VZW roamers from the +1 requirement.

    VZW reps should be able to answer questions in relation to the provisioning of service (Nationwide + Canada) and why users in Bell territory have to use +1 while anywhere else in Canada (outside rural Ontario/Quebec) the +1 isnt required. Most CSR's cant even point to Canada on a map of the world ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by XFF
    Not sure why that would be a problem. Is dialing an extra digit really that burdensome? Besides, technically it's correct to dial the country code first, then the area code, the exchange code, and finally the station code. And most modern handsets should have an "international assist" option that automatically prepends the missing country code for US subscriber numbers saved in 10-digit format.Of course VZW CSRs can't answer regarding policies and procedure implemented by foreign operators. What did you expect?

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    Quote Originally Posted by caveat71
    VZW reps should be able to answer questions in relation to the provisioning of service (Nationwide + Canada) and why users in Bell territory have to use +1 while anywhere else in Canada (outside rural Ontario/Quebec) the +1 isnt required. Most CSR's cant even point to Canada on a map of the world ;-)
    I apologize, but unfortunately at this time, Verizon Customer Service is unable to explain the random idiosyncrasies between various international roaming partners, depending on the tower you may or may not be talking on.

    Was there anything else I could resolve for you today?

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    Quote Originally Posted by XFF
    Not sure why that would be a problem. Is dialing an extra digit really that burdensome? Besides, technically it's correct to dial the country code first, then the area code, the exchange code, and finally the station code.
    Just a nit. Is Bell requiring a "+1" prefix, or just "1"? The "1" we dial for domestic long distance calls is the direct-dial long distance code used in the NANPA. It just coincidentally also happens to be the country code for the NANPA. To dial international direct calls, people in the NANPA use the international access code of 011 (followed by country code, etc). Many cell phones, particularly GSM phones, have a special code to prefix the appropriate international access code for wherever they are. This is written as "+", so to dial the US from, say, Europe, one would dial "+1 555 555 1212". This was particularly important when the Europeans designed GSM, since every county had (has?) its own different international access code.

    Since both Canada and the US are in the NANPA, we don't use the international dialing format for calls between Canada and the US. We just use the domestic format, even though they are foreign calls.

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    I'm not sure if this is the same thing you guys are discussing here, but I use both Bell and Verizon phones all the time on Bell's network here in Newfoundland and you don't have to dial 1 before the NPA. You CAN dial 1 if you want, but if you don't, it'll still go through. Only difference is if you don't dial the 1, you get a message stating "Your call is being connected. Please be aware that long distance charges may apply"

    D

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    Just something to keep in mind from my last conference in the big city.
    When you're in toronto, for some strange reason downtown(ie by eaton center and cn tower) your phone will show full bars for verizon with no roaming, but you'll never be able to make a call.
    You'll need to force your phone to roam mode only to be able to place any calls.
    I know it seems really strange but that's the way it works. There's something funny with the towers there.
    My friends that were with me one had a local cdma carrier (thumb cellular) and his phone normally roams on verizon and his phone showed roaming with the same signal strength as mine and he couldn't call out or receive calls either. my other friend had at&t and his roamed just fine on rogers (ick)
    After i forced my phone to roam only, it worked perfectly fine.

    Now remember this only pertains to toronto, my phone worked fine when i was outside of town before i got to missasagaua.

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    DrewNL - You are on Aliant's not Bell's network. Different results :-) Bell has no "native" network there (yet) as the switching center and design are all still very much Aliant, but marketed as Bell.

    BajaMnstr - Seen the same thing, closer to the lakeshore you are the worse it is. Signals are making it across the lake and making for "pilot pollution" Our VZW phones try desparately to hold on to the VZW network and in doing so will drain your battery. It gets worse as you go up as well (say the 30th floor of the Hilton). The same phenomneon happens in Niagara Falls along the QEW. Too far for a signal which will carry a call but too close to extended netwrork roam over to Telus.

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    Switch design and implementation is and always has been exactly the same in the Atlantic Provinces as in ON or QC, with the only differences being the method of end user provisioning and of course, outward branding. I'll skip the history lesson, but BCE has been the majority player in Aliant (and the 4 provincial entitities before it) all along. Almost everything they've ever done has been initiated by BCE. The only total autonomy Aliant has ever had has been branding.

    I wrote a long-winded explanation of how I know what I know and how the network should operate as a consolidated entity for the past year, but I decided there is no use/need. I truly cannot speak to Ontarian network anomalies, as I've not been to Ontario since 1999.

    The only thing I'll say is that for the past 18 months, all output from the COEI techs (construction, configuration and deployment of the infrastructure items) of Bell Mobility is exactly the same regardless of what province its going to (ON, QC, PE, NS, NB, and NL equipment is/has been constructed at the facility I am familiar with).

    This "feature" of not needing to dial 1 is not something that Aliant had that Bell doesn't/didn't. Its something that only came into effect in this region since Bell became the sole owner of Aliant Mobility and DownEast Communications, and was explained to Aliant employees and customers as network consolidation with current Bell (and industry) practices.

    D

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