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Thread: Rural with no conventional broadband access (But looks like EDGE is available)

  1. #1
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    Rural with no conventional broadband access (But looks like EDGE is available)

    Will EDGE let me tether my PC to an AT&T phone for a (faster than dial-up) internet connection?
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    yes, for sure
    iPhone 4 on AT&T:


    http://www.xti9.com/v3xx[/FONT][/SIZE]

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    If you can get EV-DO on sprint, it might be worthwhile to get a EV-DO data card/dongle
    Victor
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    Wirelessly posted (Palm Treo 750: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows CE; IEMobile 6.12) UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    For a faster than dialup connection? Not really.
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    As stated, if you can get EVDO or 3G, you'll kill conventional landline dial-up speeds.

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    It varies, if signal strength is good and/or there isn't much congestion on the network then yes, it's better than dialup. If the opposite of the above or you're moving (i.e bus, train etc..) then it can get painfully slow. At the most, EDGE will suffice for email and websites, but not much else.

    The type of device you use (data card vs phone) can affect the top speed you'll see, as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slackeyed
    Will EDGE let me tether my PC to an AT&T phone for a (faster than dial-up) internet connection?
    with proper data, yes
    the speed can reach up to 240kbps (usually 100-180kbps depends on mulitple conditions)
    the best phones for tethering are Samsung and SE phones



    Optimum/Cablevision

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slackeyed
    Will EDGE let me tether my PC to an AT&T phone for a (faster than dial-up) internet connection?
    Yes, there are many phones and many plans that will allow you to tether with your AT&T plan in an EDGE neighbourhood.

    However, you would do well to get someone to test the kinds of speeds you will be getting where you plan on using the phone.

    You're going to have to be maxing out the theoretical EDGE limit (up around 300K) before you will be beating dial-up with a good proxy. If you are testing an EDGE connection at much less than the theoretical maximum, then the inherent latency of the connection is going to make it appear to be slower than a regular dial up connection.

    Likewise, a satellite connection through Hughes will be expensive for what you get, and the extra latency will make it slower than dial-up unless you are paying for more bandwidth than they would usually offer a retail customer.

    If you are living somewhere that you cannot get even 768K DSL connections, then (and you're not going to like this) my honest advice would be to make sure that you have an AOL POP that you can reach without incurring long distance charges, and pay for a simple, cheap AOL plan...and then resolve that you need to get used to using the AOL client software with the proxy turned on.

    The AOL Dulles proxy is so good that even people like me with FIOS or a boosted Comcast line will still manage their Web sites through the Dulles proxy. With so many people dropping AOL these days, the performance of the proxy is even better than it was in its heyday.

    Very, very low latency, sterling performance that boosts the perceived performance of whatever connection you have, and you get the bonus of free McAfee premium anti-virus services, the best heuristic Spam protection available on the Internet, and automatic spyware protection.

    I know that this advice will be unpopular, and you will probably be annoyed by the AOL advertising schemes that are impossible to avoid (HOSTS files and anti-adware do not work with AOL)...but...you will definitely be impressed with the speed you're browsing the Web, in relation to your actual connection speed.

    The only reason I'd spring for a satellite connection is if you're a beta tester way out in the country and you need to download files faster than 64K. In this case the need for a speedier download over rides the perceived horrible latency of satellite when browsing the Web.

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Knighton

    You're going to have to be maxing out the theoretical EDGE limit (up around 300K) before you will be beating dial-up with a good proxy. If you are testing an EDGE connection at much less than the theoretical maximum, then the inherent latency of the connection is going to make it appear to be slower than a regular dial up connection.

    I know that this advice will be unpopular, and you will probably be annoyed by the AOL advertising schemes that are impossible to avoid (HOSTS files and anti-adware do not work with AOL)...but...you will definitely be impressed with the speed you're browsing the Web, in relation to your actual connection speed.
    In an effort to avoid beating the proverbial dead horse...I have a lenghty thread going on another forum regarding my internet options..Satellite is not feasible..

    http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?t=113388

    But just to clarify...are you suggesting that I'll be pleased with the speed of AOL dial-up?

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    Quote Originally Posted by timeless2
    As stated, if you can get EVDO or 3G, you'll kill conventional landline dial-up speeds.

    As a current sprint customer, using my cell phone to connect to the internet at my house gets me dial-up speeds. I can't get EVDO at my residence. Whenever I drive through most cities, I connect at high speed.

    "Nationwide Sprint Network (avg. 50 Kbps - 70 Kbps download and upload)"


    3G is AT&T's EDGE service?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slackeyed
    But just to clarify...are you suggesting that I'll be pleased with the speed of AOL dial-up?
    I have been doing this for a long, long time. Probably a lot longer than anybody else you're likely to run across.

    I help out with Google Management, AOL LLC, and one of the world's largest Internet discussion boards.

    If there is anything that I have learned the hard way, it is that if all you are doing is managing Web sites, latency and an excellent proxy mean a lot more than actual connect speed.

    If your choices are satellite, EDGE connections and dial-up, then you need to go with dial-up.

    And of all the dial-up you can get, AOL is the best simply because of the excellence of the Dulles Proxy. Most people don't know this, but about 90% of all Internet traffic in North America goes through Dulles. If there's anything they have learned over the past 20 years it's how to keep the proxy going.

    I have actually managed a site for a full ten minutes after it has gone down for people not using the Dulles proxy.... I got email later asking how I had made changes to the site while it was down! The proxy apparently queued my changes and inserted them. I know it sounds impossible...but I saw it with my own eyes.

    I hate to sound like I work for these guys, and I am fully aware that you will find the advertising annoying. That belies the point that it's simply the best proxy available and if you are stuck with dial up then it's the best choice for you, IMHO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slackeyed
    3G is AT&T's EDGE service?
    No. EDGE is usually referred to as 2.5G. In theory, you could get a connection of 300K in a neighbourhood where they've allocated all the slots and tweaked the system for a lot of iPhone users stuck on EDGE.

    The problem is that there is a perceived latency involved with all wireless connections. 300K is the high theoretical and you're usually going to be under 200K and very often out in the country where there are not a lot of data users you will be connecting at 70K or 90K.

    Once you introduce the added latency of an EDGE connection, then you are perceiving that you are browsing the Web much slower than you would be on a good dial up connection of 53.3K.

    If you are getting the 3G icon on an AT&T array, then you will be at least on UMTS. This will in theory get you up to around 1.5 mbps, but in practicality it's more like 300K - 700K in my experience.

    On many AT&T 3G systems, HSDPA is activated. This means that in theory you could get a 3.6 mbps connection, but of course in actuality it is usually much slower.

    There are even a very few AT&T systems where 7.2 mbps has been turned on.

    This all seems a great shame to somebody who has chosen to lead his life out in the country where he cannot get even 768K DSL.

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Knighton
    I have been doing this for a long, long time. Probably a lot longer than anybody else you're likely to run across.

    I help out with Google Management, AOL LLC, and one of the world's largest Internet discussion boards.

    If there is anything that I have learned the hard way, it is that if all you are doing is managing Web sites, latency and an excellent proxy mean a lot more than actual connect speed.

    If your choices are satellite, EDGE connections and dial-up, then you need to go with dial-up.

    And of all the dial-up you can get, AOL is the best simply because of the excellence of the Dulles Proxy. Most people don't know this, but about 90% of all Internet traffic in North America goes through Dulles. If there's anything they have learned over the past 20 years it's how to keep the proxy going.

    I have actually managed a site for a full ten minutes after it has gone down for people not using the Dulles proxy.... I got email later asking how I had made changes to the site while it was down! The proxy apparently queued my changes and inserted them. I know it sounds impossible...but I saw it with my own eyes.

    I hate to sound like I work for these guys, and I am fully aware that you will find the advertising annoying. That belies the point that it's simply the best proxy available and if you are stuck with dial up then it's the best choice for you, IMHO.
    I don't manage websites. I don't use a Dulles proxy. I live 25 miles from the state capital and cant enjoy broadband internet. Streaming video, microsoft marketplace, xbox live, catching up online on our favorite TV shows that we missed.

    These are just some of the things that I need (want) the internet for. I'm searching for a broadband solution, and that's why I wrote the Attorney General yesterday regarding Time Warner's field survey near my house.

    I have a neighbor 1/4 mile away with Time Warner.

    Finding a wireless internet (cell phone) provider appears to be my best choice. My cell phone connects at lickety split broadband speeds when I'm near a city so if I can find a high speed cell service that hits my house, I can tether and rock and roll.

    AOL dial up is superior?

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    I have already given the best answer that I can provide.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slackeyed
    AOL dial up is superior?
    To EDGE? Certainly not. I've traveled in EDGE areas and have found the downlink speeds to be typically twice the speed of dialup (around 110-120kbps sustained, with bursts to 180).

    Also bear in mind that if you don't qualify for DSL in your area, then it's likely you have a particularly lengthy or noisy phone line. As a result, I wouldn't count on full 56k speeds. For dialup, you're probably looking in the 33-48k range, though I've seen particularly unlucky people in outlying areas connect a 28.8k or even 24k.

    Even if you do decide to go with dialup, you might want to do a little googling and find the cheapest possible ISP. AOL has the $9.95 basic plan now, but there are other providers like basicisp.net that offer service for even lower than that. There is absolutely nothing that AOL can provide you that the cheaper ISPs cannot. AOL's stuff is all fluff, and wholly unnecessary.

    Left: iPhone 6+ on T-Mobile. Right: Comcast home internet connection.

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